a blog about poetic creativity*******************ALL IMAGES © Stephanie Reid for HaikuFlash

Creativity

Tune in to Green (nature short film series) Exhibition Three – *Now Showing* online

Our sister organization, Diorama Room Arts has just made its, Tune in to Green – Exhibition Three live! The online show features 80-minutes of short films, under five minutes each, by artists who create in dialogue with nature. Artist statements and bios are also included. This show if full of color, music, and is decidedly rocky. The works include animation, 16mm film, and video. The trailer and rental link are below.

Featuring: Rachel Wagner – Columbus, Ohio; Jérémy Griffaud – Nice, France; Jay Roff-Garcia Venezuela & Austin, Texas; Anne-Katrin Speiss of New York, filming in Utah; Heidi Landau and Becky Mendizabal of Austin, filming in Utah; Stephanie Reid of Austin, filming in Bastrop; Jane Mast filming in Florida; Barbara and Dallas Rychener of Ohio filming in South Carolina; Lizzie Palumbo – Jeju Island, Republic of Korea; Asher Mains – Grenada, West Indies; Todd Rychener – Austin; gwen Charles – New Jersey; Anne Sophie Lorange – Norway; Dave Fields – Alaska; Roberto Turani – Milan filming in Tuscany and Lombardy; Florian Maricourt – France; Anna Bierler – Amsterdam; Elly Cho of New York and Seoul, filming in Thailand; Tina Šulc Resnik – Ljubljana, Slovenia; Wilson Kuzhur – Kerala, India; Salvatore Insana and Elisa Turco Liveri of Rome, filming in Cessalto; Deborah S. Phillips – Berlin; Emilie and Ralphe Crewe – Vancouver; Melissa Lockwood – Yavapai, Arizona; Maximilien Proctor – Berlin; gibberish – Los Angeles; Anna Berendsen – Geertruidenberg, The Netherlands; Laura Gillis – Toronto

There is a small fee to get a 72-hour streaming rental. However, starting your ad-free Vimeo account to view the show is free, and easy. Here’s how to get yours started: After you click the “Rent $7” button, it should ask you to Join or Log in. Enter your name, email address, and a password, then click “Join with email”. It will either log you in right away OR ask you to check your email for a message from them to confirm it’s really you.

Enjoy and please leave us a comment or like there after you watch it. Thanks!


Tune in to Green online short film series – Exhibition Two *Now Showing*

Tune in to Green – Exhibition Two, features 60 fascinating minutes of video, animation, poetry, and sound created by 19 artists + supporting crew, whose practice is in dialogue with nature. Featuring: Jan Adamove filming in Slovakia and Croatia; Rachel Glasser, Stephanie Reid, Brooke Gassiot & Kate Csillagi, and Dane Rougeau – Austin, Texas; Mélissa Faivre, filming in Haarlem, Netherlands; Mateo Vargas filming in Costa Rica; Tamara Maksimović – Bosnia and Herzegovina; Manuel Rossi and Dario Ricciardi – Argentina; Jody Zellen – Los Angeles; Orsolya Gal – Romania; Linda Duvall filming in Treaty 6 Lands (Canada); Gwen Charles – New Jersey; Enrique Cabrera filming in Seattle; Muriel Montini and Calypso Debrot – France; Daniel Lofgren – New York.

There is a small fee to get a 72-hour streaming rental. However, starting your ad-free Vimeo account to view the show is free, and easy. Here’s how to get yours started: After you click the “Rent $7” button, it should ask you to Join or Log in. Enter your name, email address, and a password, then click “Join with email”. It will either log you in right away OR ask you to check your email for a message from them to confirm it’s really you.

Enjoy and please leave us a comment there after you watch it. Thanks!

Submissions for Exhibition Three are due by May 2nd at https://dioramaroom.com

Professional, semi-pro, and amateur video makers (even using cell phones on FHD mode) are encouraged to submit experimental, animated, vignette, and abstract films that create a dialogue between humans and nature, with a max. running time of 5-minutes.


Open Call for Short Films and Animation

There are still a couple of spots left for the second online exhibition of “Tune in to Green”. If you have a project that features nature and is 5 minutes or less, see the poster below. We have artist talks and help promote your work on social media. Some artists will also receive a small gift for helping us increase viewership. We assist those who have quality footage, but do not have editing tools, for example if you shot your footage in FHD on your cell phone. The call is open to all styles of film making – experimental, abstract, animated, and documentary all welcome. There is no entry fee. Our goal is to share our experiences in the out-of-doors during this time of social distancing.


New Online Fest of Short Nature Films

Tune in to Green is a new series of video shorts created in 2020 and features experimental, animation, video poems, and high-quality footage by eight artists filming from Santa Fe, Austin, New Zealand, New York, and Canada. Stephanie Reid – Austin, TX; Fumihito Sugawara – Austin; Todd Rychener – Austin; Kathryn Alvarez – Vancouver Island; Beau Baco – NYC; Claudine Metrick – upstate NY; Jesse St. Louis and Samantha Andress – L.A./New Zealand; and Jane Sanders – Santa Fe. All videos 5 minutes or less. Total running time: 24 minutes

See the trailer or click the Rent $7.00 button below. This exhibition ended on February 22, 2021, so is no longer available to rent, but you can see a sampling of the works by watching the trailer below.

Submissions for the second online exhibition are due on February 8, 2021 at https://dioramaroom.com


Short Films : Call for Entries

Haiku Flash Studios has just completed a poster, website, Vimeo, and Facebook pages for our new sister organization, Diorama Room, LLC, which may eventually become a non-profit and get a physical space if the online exhibitions are a success. Check it out:

Spending more time outside? Shooting some cool video? Spending more time in your film making studio? Submit your <5 minute shorts to the “Tune in to Green” online film series by November 8th! See the Call for Entry details at: https://dioramaroom.com


Su Casa es Mi Casa

Some shots from the juried exhibit, Gimme Shelter, at Columbia City Gallery in Seattle, where I am showing my project, Su Casa es Mi Casa (video and building cards). According to the gallery’s website, Gimme Shelter “speaks to the many types of dislocation happening in society today both locally and internationally. Artists working in 2D, 3D and video address issues of homelessness, gentrification and refugee dislocation.”

My project focuses on twelve meandering months of sacrificing stability to focus on art by completing an MFA, showing work abroad, having difficulty trying to find employment during school and after graduation, and thus also trying to find a long term residence, especially where rising rent costs are prohibitive. Here, 26 surfaces slept in during that time are the focal point. Some while house sitting, dog sitting, renting cheap rooms briefly, or visiting far away friends.

The images are rendered in impermanent media in a style touching on the vulnerability and fragility of a dollhouse, yet in some cases are also reminiscent of an interior blueprint. They are primarily recollections from memory vs. photographic representations. Therefore, the room renderings are wrought with inaccuracies and omissions. Words are imperceptible in the disorienting layered monologue which ponders the meaning of “home” for someone who has accepted nomadism and expansion through travel and creativity over domesticity, yet longs for a place to settle down. The disquieting incompleteness and constant change provides comfort through spaciousness and balances the alternative by thwarting staleness. On the other hand, constant movement is contrary to the stillness needed to support long term goals. Therefore, balance must be found between the two, just as it is required to build a house of cards. The concentration, energy, and persistence needed to succeed during this period of transition is apparent in the tension of the monologue and motion of the builder and camera operators, Stephanie Reid and Todd Rychener.

Camera operation: Stephanie Reid and Todd Rychener
Illustrations, Direction, and Editing by Stephanie Reid

Video: https://vimeo.com/221571137

Detailed images of the cards: http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery/Su-Casa-es-Mi-Casa/G0000UW0W15mhFLE/C0000nFrmMwTH.y4


Creatures in the Moon

Stills from a handmade book, Creatures in the Moon, that I made in collaboration with Todd Rychener to be sent to Telavi State University (Republic of Georgia) as a gift for their library. Book artist / educator, Miriam Schaer, will be delivering the books in person during her Fulbright awarded trip to teach and research felt and embroidery in art book making. Todd and I illustrated our book with colored pencils, gel pens, paint pigment, and gouache. The story is the third in a series of book films I am currently working on.

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Winter Shadows

In between larger, complex projects, I do simple ones like this little series of photos, Winter Shadows (a follow up to my Autumn Shadows series from 2015) in collaboration with another Austin artist, Todd Rychener, for the Weather show at Lower Level Creative Space in Denver with colleagues Lindey Anderson from Colorado (Gallery Director), Asher Mains from Grenada, and Andy Spaziani from Canada.

empty seed pods

dead leaves

bare twigs

empty seed pods

winter color

winter-shadows

 

 

 

 


Bon Courage

French flag towers

Bon Courage

As shock, grief, and anger worked its way through me over this event I took my time to write out my thoughts and feelings over it before really discussing it publicly.

Friday, November 13th, 2015: Attacks in Paris. Over 300 deaths and injuries, such as possibly debilitating ones like bullets in the legs. Many people, including those who have bad mouthed France, and especially Paris, to me colorize their Facebook pages in the colors of the French flag or the peace symbol with Eiffel Tower graphic in support. I refrain because I don’t want to be misunderstood as simply jumping on the bandwagon or not caring about attacks elsewhere in the world. I hope those who though ill of Paris before have had a change of heart after seeing how well they stuck together. My thoughts below are in my constant defense of the City of Light. Have you seen a sunset there or on a train from Paris to the SE coast? It is indescribably lovely. The pink light on centuries old carved stone, the river, the twinkling tower on the hour, the fairy tale chateaus and hills dotted with sheep. Then there is the food! Don’t get me started. Paris & France are not better than anywhere else, but unique in a marvelous way.

Saturday, November 14th, 2015: I’m not going to hide the fact that I resent people trying to make us feel guilty for our grief over Friday’s attacks in Paris or worse yet acting like the people who were killed had it coming to them because their governments are corrupt. I had seen it mentioned in the news just as I had seen the attacks in the Kenyan university in April and the almost constant attacks in the Middle East. I read all of them and cried but know not what to do, so have to quickly separate myself from it. What would you have us do, stare into the face of terrorism every day? Have it effect our entire life when we have no control over it? I’m not going to apologize for not wanting to be in pain every day. So, if two other people hadn’t brought it up that night in more detail I probably would have moved on with my life and not given it more of my energy, despite the fact that I have been to Paris several times, spent enough time there to feel I know it well, and spent a lot of time practicing speaking French.

However, as details were revealed, on top of feeling like a dear friend has been hurt and a large number of people injured or killed while they were in her arms, I am seeing the effect of this on music. I spend a great deal of time in concert halls and venues. Not only has the entire city been shut down for days, but many musicians have lost their livelihood by having their shows canceled there. If you know nothing about Paris, you should at least know that creativity has thrived there for decades. A vast list of talented people flock to, are accepted, and thrive there…Nina Simone, Salvador Dali, Coco Chanel, Albert Camus, Brassaï, Marcel Duchamp, Josephine Baker, Vincent Van Gogh, Daguerre, The Lumière Brothers, Les Nubians, Birdy Nam Nam…If these names mean nothing to you perhaps this is why you can’t understand how tragic this feels. I am an artist, so it hits me hard.

A man made a song as an emotional response and way to cope with this situation and people are commenting on his Soundcloud page that he is trying to cash in and/or get attention in the wake of this tragedy (despite him not selling the song). Seriously?! If you have no understanding of the need to express yourself artistically, please find an outlet. Art is not a crime and neither is a party or being fabulous. This sound artist was trying to heal himself with his artform and thankfully many responses were positive, including from a 10th arrondisement resident who said it was therapeutic while dealing with the aftermath. Others angrily wanted to know why he didn’t write a song for the people who died in Beirut or Baghdad…

Have you ever been to Paris? Yes, many of us in the west know a great deal more about it than those two cities because we have been there. I have been welcomed there on several occasions and had an amazing time. No, I don’t buy into the, “Everyone is rude in Paris,” line because I have never had anyone be rude to me there. It’s a big city. Just because you spent a lot of money on your vacation to get there, doesn’t mean everyone is going to want to be your best friend once you arrive. If someone bumps into you in the sidewalk because you were standing in the middle of foot traffic looking at your map expecting them to say, “excuse me” is ridiculous (True story). Trust me, if someone in Paris, New York, or Miami wants to get rude with you, it will be blatantly clear.

Like most major cities, Paris is very multicultural, meaning it welcomes people around the world to represent it. Pulling out the, “You’re only upset about this because white people got hurt,” card is extremely insensitive, two-dimensional, and well, I hate to say it, but racist. The musician I wrote about in the previous paragraph is black. I implore people with this sentiment to check the list they have made so far of people who died in that concert hall and soccer arena, then think a little harder before jumping to spread more hatred in this world. Unless one has personally found a remedy to the situation in Syria, or anywhere else there is bloodshed, they are not morally superior to those who feel more personal grief for a place they are familiar with than a place they are not. If someone has a peaceful solution, I wish they would share it with us. I am sure there are millions of people who would join to enact it. Many of us pray for peace in this world and act as consciously as we can to be sensitive to other people’s plights. We wait for our current leaders try to undo the mess the ones before them have made. We wait for them to make the best decisions and when it’s not working, we must wait some more until they try something different. We must voice our opinions and hope they listen to reason. We must keep peace and tolerance on an individual and local level. It has a domino effect. We must find assertive ways to try to change the minds of people who are racist and aggressive.

In the meanwhile, please don’t tell others they shouldn’t be upset or supportive of the people, in a place we feel an affinity for, after vicious bloodshed. How would it feel if my friend’s home and your family’s home were bombed and I told you that people shouldn’t be upset about your home because that would mean they don’t care about my friend’s home being bombed? That doesn’t even make sense! Peaceful people don’t want anyone in the world to suffer and there are many of us out there. I daresay we are the majority, despite what fear mongerers would like to believe and have you do the same. The anti-muslim sentiments need to stop as well. No one wants to feel like an outsider or be harassed because of their upbringing. I can’t believe that on this day someone smeared pages torn from the Koran with feces on the walls of a mosque in a suburb of my city. The interview on the radio was with a Muslim man who is American born and a member of that house of worship. He was beside himself with trying to figure out how to explain this obscenity to his children.

Sunday, November 22nd, 2015: Oh and here’s a good one…victim blaming. I read someone post about how the empires have colonized the rest of the world for centuries and now the European colonizers are “getting theirs”. Then as an after thought, a statement of sympathy for the people of Paris and those who died. Pardon me? How is it that any of the people who were harmed responsible for history? Talk about opportunism! Then there are politicians saying they brought it on themselves because they were listening to death metal. Apparently they have never heard of primal scream therapy or had a healthy thrashing about to release anger without hurting anyone.

Here’s the thing that needs to be said over and over, whoever is responsible for these atrocities can not be allowed to make us live in fear or turn against each other. United we stand, divided we fall. This is a fact, not a nationalistic cliché.

Monday, November 23rd, 2015: I think I can finally put this to rest after watching this Parisian man discuss the attacks with his young son in such a brave and kind way. Bon courage mes amis. Je t’aime toujours, peu importe ce que quelqu’un dit ou fait.

https://www.facebook.com/Upworthy/videos/1134197836621073/?fref=nf


Pop Austin International 2015 – Illumination

Fair Market on E. 5th Street in Austin hosted another enjoyable Pop International art fair October 23rd – 25th. Smartly designed to be quite different from their event last year’s, the theme of Illumination featuring a  installation work which utilized wide variety of lighting techniques including neon, video, colored bulbs and LEDs, black lights, fiber optics, and holograms.

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Colour Code triptych

Variations of Hans Kotter’s color changing bar entitled Colour Code

 

Hans Kotter color changing illusion of tunnels in infinite space

Hans Kotter color changing illusion of tunnels in infinite space

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Educator and PsiPlay partner Jerome Morrison uses a Kinect motion sensor to create interactive videos. At Illumination he created a video installation room with several television monitors and headphones for an intimate viewing experience and communion with an entity from the heart and soul of the broadcast universe.

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Adela Andea installation work

Adela Andea installation detail with spinning CD drives

Illumination-11

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Lori Hersberger's Constellation

Lori Hersberger’s Constellation

Constellation-2

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Hologram (Green/Orange) by James Turrell

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Todd Sanders neon Luchadores

Illumination-17

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Nonotak art partners,  Noemi Schipfer and  Takami Nakamoto mesmerizing installation video clip:

https://vimeo.com/143813138

Nonotak (Noemi Schipfer and Takami Nakamoto) collaborative video installation work

Nonotak video installation still

Nonotak (Noemi Schipfer and Takami Nakamoto) collaborative video installation work

Nonotak (Noemi Schipfer and Takami Nakamoto) collaborative video installation work detail

Nonotak video installation still

Nonotak video installation still

 

 

 

 

 

Nonotak video installation still

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Carlo Bernardini fiber optic strand installation

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Other pieces in this section included:

Lili Lakich’s “Soul to Soul: Portrait of Stevie Ray Vaughn” wall sculpture made from cut aluminum in the shape of the guitar hero himself, holding a real guitar, and animated with neon and crackling krypton gas filled tubes, which simulates lightning.

Cut metal symbols, such as the infinity loop, inset with colored light bulbs by Alyssa Taylor Wendt.

Neon and plastics sign by Matthew Lapenta.

Backlit, mixed media acrylic painted panels, reminiscent of a landscape, by Claudia Meyer.

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Evan Voyles "White Noise"

Evan Voyles “White Noise”

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Bale Creek Allen showed cast metal tumbleweeds at the last Pop International show in Austin. This time around he made a row of right-side up and upside-down white neon crosses.

Lisa Schulte hung a massive wall with neon emoji symbols.

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Sharon Keshishian's neon landscape

Sharon Keshishian’s neon landscape

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Jeongmoon Choi's "?" from UV lights and string

Jeongmoon Choi’s “?” from UV lights and string

Illumination-52

 


Berlin Urban Art and Architecture

Single click thumbnails to enlarge and view as slideshow. All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid


Transart Institute Course Sampler – World as Sculpture, Wild Urbanity, and Double Lens

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid

The Transart Institute for Creative Research is a low residency school offering three Summer residencies in Berlin, two Winter residencies in New York City, and virtual meetups in between. My studies started in Berlin during this three-week residency, which was incredibly fast-paced, challenging, and rewarding. Workshops took place at Uferstudios in the Wedding district. The school is interdisciplinary, but more topical than technique based. It is expected that technique is already honed or can be self-guided. This allows the students to choose courses that they feel will help them expand the content of their praxis. PhD and MFA students attended the workshops together and work in a wide range of mediums, so that dancers, painters, sculptors, photographers, and others can grow from watching each others’ processes. At the bottom of this post, I have given an overview of the workshops I attended. I am primarily a photography and film maker, but I took classes on expanding the definition of sculpture, nature in the city, and film. My studio advisors was a performance artist / film maker. My research advisor was a photography curator / writer.

The classes typically ran from 9AM-6 PM, then students and staff reconvened at 7:00 for an hour and half presentation session. For these, the student body split into two rooms where three students gave a 15-minute overview of their work and goals for their studies, followed by a ten minute Q&A Session. In addition, each Friday morning, practicing professional artists and curators from around the world would give a 7-minute presentation of their work (Pecha Kucha). Afterwards, groups of eight students would go with one of the presenters to get feedback on their project plan.

On the weekends, gallery and studio tours, and vernissages of student exhibits around Berlin took place. To learn more about those events, see my other posts:

https://haikuflash.wordpress.com/2014/09/21/berlin-gallery-and-studio-tour-summer-2014/

https://haikuflash.wordpress.com/2014/09/22/mila-kunst-and-linder-project-transart-institute-mfa-and-phd-student-works-summer-2014/

https://haikuflash.wordpress.com/2014/09/21/somos-gallery-berlin-open-frame-popup-show-august-2-2014/

studio courtyard

Uferstudios courtyard facing NW. The complex used to be a rail yard for horse drawn carriage rail, then eventually a depot for electric street cars and cable cars. The architect, Jean Krämer, designed them using using a combination of expressionist and Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity, or without ornamentation) styles.

studio courtyard2

Uferstudios courtyard facing SE.

Michael Bowdidge’s, The World as Sculpture, course for MFA and Certificate students

Our instructor also teaches at the University of Glasgow. Inspired by the book The World as Sculpture: The Changing Status of Sculpture from the Renaissance to the Present Day by James Hall, Mr. Bowdidge exposed our  class to methods of making our work more sculptural. The course was exciting and felt very productive. By default, we received a thorough survey of the history of sculpture. Not only did the professor bring examples for each discussion, but asked us to also bring images and physical work to enhance the conversation. The following examples of some of the reading assignments and activities we did in the four day course.

 DAY ONE:

1) Discuss reading assignment : Sculpture and the sculptural by Erik Koed

2) Work with a partner to combine two objects together in as many ways possible. Photograph the different iterations. Several minutes into the exercise, classmate and dancer, Jeca Rodriguez suggested giving a theme to the juxtapositions such as to make one the oppressor and the other the oppressed. My partner Claire Elizabeth Barratt, also a dancer, and I came up with over 20 ways to combine her hand with my umbrella.

3) Bring an example of artwork that is not sculpture but has something sculptural about it. I brought the links to Gabriel Dawe’s string installations:

Gabriel Dawe's plexus no. 5

Gabriel Dawe’s plexus no. 5

Gabriel Dawe's plexus no. 8

Gabriel Dawe’s plexus no. 8

Gabriel Dawe's relic from plexus no. 4

Gabriel Dawe’s relic from plexus no. 4

4) Select an artwork from the previous class discussion and make a piece inspired by it that is in some way sculptural.

  Classmate Nethery Wylie shared Laleh Mehran’s installation Entropic Order http://www.lalehmehran.com/Entropic-Order, in which a programmed machine moves around a track on the ceiling, all the while, dragging a pendulum with it to draw traditional Islamic patterns in black “sand” on the floor. A motion detector senses people entering the room and moving about, which disrupts the action of the pendulum so that the perfection of its efforts is thwarted. Straight lines become wavy, shaky, and distorted. Therefore, this artwork functions as a way to comment on the futility of attempting to enforce a dogma, religious or not, because once human interaction comes into play, the static nature of “rules” is replaced by dynamic forces. It also reflects the instability of the Middle East.

  I chose to do an exercise that was both subtractive and additive at the same time. I imagined adding spices commonly used in Persian cooking – paprika, cinnamon, and cumin to “draw” outlines to the negative space in the designs. Then using a piece of paper covered with double sided sticky graphics film to do a “rubbing”. What would hopefully remain on the adhesive tape would be an impression of the design from its sand and spices. The red and brown hues represent spilled blood of those who suffered within a turbulent and violent landscape. By transferring the image onto the graphics tape, the new image can also represent those who have migrated to flee the regime. They are only able to take a fraction of their culture with them. I have made sculptural work by using additive (spices), subtractive (taking away with the tape), and replicatative (a copy of the original design) steps. It was not unlike forming a sand mandala, and the same ideas of displacement and lost culture expressed in my response to her could be said for Tibetans and Native Americans who make sand drawings that are wiped away after their completion.

photo taken during the process of filling in the gaps of Mehran’s design with paprika

paprika and black “sand”

transfer of paprika and black “sand” to another surface

DAY TWO: Additive processes. Discussions of Modeling vs. Assembling.

1) Bring a sculptural artwork you have made but feel is not quite complete, then discuss how to make it more sculptural using modeling. I had previously made a set mixed CDs for a Leo friend in Los Angeles. I titled the compilations, The Moon and a Lantern for more mellow tracks and The Sun and a Lion for more upbeat tracks. The compilation titles were named specifically after the cover art illustrations I drew for them, using scribbled circles for the heavenly orbs and the origami folding line pattern for the object not seen in the drawing, but referenced in the title (lantern and lion). To see those images, visit: https://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Other-Illustration-and-Mixed-Media/G0000xdw0IFgWFaE/I0000qtO9L770Cqw/C00000PRsirHYLFo

and

https://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Other-Illustration-and-Mixed-Media/G0000xdw0IFgWFaE/I0000v75gIs.daRA/C00000PRsirHYLFo

  Along the same lines, I created this illustration created for a world music compilation I also selected the songs for. I infer three-dimensionality by layering origami fold lines for a pine tree on top of the world map image. In response to the exercise, I stated that to make it more sculptural, I would fold (model) the illustration into its intended shape. The pine tree can then be set upon the circular song list that normally lies under the CD, to transform from packaging design to sculptural artwork.

CD close The Earth and a Pine Tree 150dpi OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2) Assemblage is a term used by curator William Seitz for a MOMA show in 1961, called “That Art of Assemblage”, featured works by Duchamp, Schwitters, Cornell and others who combined things like trinkets, household objects, newspaper clippings, and train tickets to create compositions, combined with or without traditional mediums like paint. Seitz felt the term was more descriptive than “collage” for that particular body of work.

Reading assignment: Assemblage by George Marcus and Erkan Saka.                                                                                                             

Summary: Assemblage as a way to talk about chaos of modern world despite the daily structure which most of us live by. There are many possible ways to approach investigation into realms beyond clearly defined boundaries. Discourse on temporary societies, a self-reflective description of an object, or a stage in a process are all examples of how assemblage can be used to explain intangible concepts. The ability to materialize such abstract ideas has had an influence on areas outside of art such as anthropological research. Marcus and Saka credit the success of the integration of post-structuralist ideas into social sciences to analytically detailed writings by theorists Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. This essay goes on to quote several social scientists who discuss how their work has been influenced by the theories of Deleuze and Guattari.

Finally, the writing expresses urgency that assemblage be handled carefully as to not become too structural or it runs the risk of losing it’s ephemeral quality. It is noted that during our current phase of globalization and rapid technological advancements, which are creating new behaviors in society, assemblage has a great deal of material to refer to and in a unique way from its original use in the early to mid 20th century.

3) Create an artwork based on Guattari and Deleuze’s philosophy, sometimes called “assemblage theory”. In layman’s terms this process refers to the laying out, arranging, and piecing together of components. In theoretical terms these are called or coding, stratification, and territorialization. Many conceptual artists develop their works by decoding, then recoding / deterritorializing, then reterritorializing these relationships, so that the stratification of the subjects in the assemblage is likely to change. So there is an analysis of the aspects (coding) of each component in a relationship and how those aspects create categorization (territorializing) of the subjects, which in turn cause them to be organized (stratified) in such a way. The goal of a contemporary artist working inside this loosely knit framework is essentially to recontextualize the subjects and present them in a new way that opens up discussion about the previously coding, territory, and stratification of the subjects. By causing the audience to think about the new assemblage of components, it opens up the reality that what we thought to be static has other possible states of being and/or meaning.

  For this exercise, I thought about the process of making and consuming coffee. The goal of coffee drinkers is to be more awake and sharp thinking. Therefore, I coffee stained a square piece of paper, making it reminiscent of an unbleached coffee filter, and folded it into a crystal/diamond shape. Further discussion was spurred regarding the fortune made by coffee moguls who do not practice fair trade and how the diamond is not “clear”. It is brown, or “muddy” representing the possible side effects of drinking coffee vs. other types of beverages such as matcha tea, herbal supplements, or physical practices which render us more alert such as yoga, improving our diets, or simply getting more sleep. It also speaks to sugar addiction, which is often the main reason people drink coffee – to get their dose of sugar and milk.

4) In the vein of Allan Kaprow’s 1967 installation “Yard”, which was a room of tires for people to interact with by jumping through, sitting on, standing on, or even throwing them, the class did a performative installation. First we each passed a piece of paper around that we had written one word that reminded us of the Transart summer residency, and then passed it to the person next to us until everyone had written their word on our paper. We chanted the following list in rounds during the performance: succinct, iconoclast, join, concepts, humid, tsunami, pleasure, becoming, awake, microcosm, fluid, flux, coffee, turnip, tinted, sprudel. To view the performance, visit: https://vimeo.com/106896282

DAY THREE: Subtractive processes. Carving, deleting (what this means in the digital vs. analog world), erasing

1) Inspired by Rauschenberg’s “Erased de Kooning” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGRNQER16Do), bring an artwork you have made and are willing to allow a fellow student to practice a subtractive technique on. After receiving each artwork, we parted for about 45 mins. then reconvened for our destructive surprise.

I built a diorama landscape study and my partner was the dancer, Jeca Rodriguez, who is originally from Puerto Rico. She turned my diorama into a performance! She was really nervous to do her idea, but I assured her whatever she wanted to do was okay. She took the assemblage outside and mangled it something fierce to make it look like her home after a hurricane. Then she had everyone take turns, like the community on her island, to try to repair a little bit at a time. It was really touching and even brought a tear to my eye.

 

diorama study

Photos below taken by Michael Bowdidge.

destruction Jaye Gabriela2 Clare Ana gabe recovery

  The piece I was given to deconstruct was a silk scarf by artist, Dana Zurzolo, who silkscreens guns into clothing as a way to prompt conversations about guns in America. There are magazines and catalogues about guns with cover photos clearly intending to make them look “sexy”. I cutout machine gun spray shapes resembling those found in comic books, drew hearts, blood, and tears in glitter pens, then also cutout bullet holes in the heart. Because this clothing was meant to appeal to a woman, just as hot chicks with guns are supposed to make women feel empowered, or appeal to the violent urges of machismo in either sex, I changed the text about a school shooting that was printed on the scarf to read as if the atrocity was made by a woman. The text was also changed to draw attention to the language of guns and their reference to female body parts.

subractive and additive

2) Inspired by John Cage’s 4”33, bring ‘nothing’ to class, but in a meaningful way that can be justified with regard to size / quantity / duration. The best example was someone shining a projector’s light on the screen with no image or text.

DAY FOUR: Replicative processes. Copying, casting, copying, sampling

1) Replicate something in the nearby surroundings.

Bullet Wounds and Fissures

a pitted, fissured, and chipped brick wall

The crumbling wall

pencil rubbing, razor cut, and punctured paper

2) Replicate another artist’s work without directly copying it. Taking a que from Lawrence Yuxweluptun’s painting below, I sketched a still from a scene in a short film I am making.  In the video, my friend Laura is dancing in front of a graffiti wall, but in the drawing, I started to draw the graffiti on her body.

Walking in the Spirit World

Walking in the Spirit World by Lawrence Yuxweluptun

Laura

graffiti skin

unfinished sketch

3) Reading: The Precession of Simulacra by Baudrillard, which gave the four phases of abstracting an original object as the reflection of a basic reality, the masking and/or perversion of a reality, the masking of the absence of a basic reality, and the absence of any relation to reality.

4) Work from an image/sound/clip/movement and find ways to replicate it which allow you to traverse or reference the four phases of simulacra. The scan of the image I created will not translate well here. There are aspects of the piece that are dependent on moving around it and reflective light that have to be experience in person.

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Caroline Koebel’s, Wild Urbanity, course for MFA and Certificate students

Inspired by her sighting of wild foxes in Berlin, Ms. Koebel designed a course around combing art with nature in the city.

1) discussion of Joseph Bueys hare and wolf performances

2) viewing of the film “A Rabbit in Berlin”

3) readings from Darwin, da Vinci, and the thoroughly enjoyable The Forest Unseen: A Year’s Watch in Nature by David George Haskell

4) Tour of the archives of the Naturkundmuseum. Here are some of the horrifying and fascinating remnants from the days of when humans had no qualms with capturing vast numbers of animals for research. Seeing Charles Darwin’s signature in one of his journals; blown glass sculptures of medusozoa and other small flowery looking sea creatures; rooms of skulls, skeletons, horns, and taxidermied animals, in cardboard boxes, some with holes cut in the side so that stiff legs of a fast running feline can poke through; plastic bags of bats; weight lifting a fossilized dinosaur bone that must have been about 20 lbs. although only 1.5 ft; a 4 ft long narwhal tooth; a glass room displaying fish, snakes, and foxes preserved in jars of alcohol.

 

tubes of dead snakes

Images from the archive cannot be made public, but I took these photos in the public area.

5) lectures by scientists who study the wild boar and fox population in Berlin. FUN FACTS! Some of the boars have been seen waiting at the traffic lights, for cars to stop, before crossing the street. They are notoriously difficult for hunters to find in the woods as well, but because the critters like to dig up people’s lawns for bugs, many have been shot down.

 

wild boars 150

I found this postcard by Tatiana Witte in a shop the day before I left Berlin.

6) an excursion in the city to create work in response to nature found there. I’m a fan of all corvids, so admired these beautiful, monochromatic Hooded Crows since I arrived in Berlin. 

crows on train rail crows staring at pizza

Hooded Crows eat Pizza on the Tram tracks

grey and black Hooded Crows eat Pizza on the Tram tracks

stump study3 stump study5stump study8

stump study6

tiny green tree beetle tears

tiny green tree beetle tears

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Anna Faroqhi’s, Double Lens, film essay workshop for MFA and Certificate students

We weren’t sure if this class were going to be able to take place. Originally, the instructor was scheduled to be Harun Farocki, the prolific German filmmaker known for experimental documentary short films. Our course was cancelled when it was revealed that he had passed away. Then after a week or so delay, we were informed that his daughter, Anna who is also a filmmaker, would be teaching us in his stead. She informed us that The Hamburger Bahnhof Museum happened to have several of Harun’s politically charged films, Serious Games, Inextinguishable Fire, The Creators of the Shopping Worlds, and Workers Leaving the Factory, installed into an exhibition. Several of us went to view it as a way to learn more about him and to pay our respects.

2) Screening and discussion of several historial film essays: “Ghosts for Breakfast” by Hanz Richter; “11 Variations on Rain” by Joris Ivens; “Night and Fog” by Alain Resnais; “Les Mains Négatives” by Marguerite Duras; and “Serious Games” by Harun Farocki, the instructor’s recently deceased father.

3) Each student was given a line from the German Expressionist poet, Jakob van Hoddis, to film a 30 second to three minute clip to be edited together. Some lines are missing from the film or slightly altered to suit the artists. My line was, “Into the tender green of the trees”, which starts at 10:22 here: https://vimeo.com/106867894

In the Morning
A strong wind sprang upwards,
Opens the bloody gates of iron heaven,
Beats on the towers.
Brightly ringing loud and sinuous over the brazen plane of the city.
The sooty morning sun. Thundering trains on dams.
Golden angel-ploughs plow through the clouds.
Strong wind over the pale city.
Steamboats and cranes awaken by the dirty, flowing stream.
The bells of the weathered cathedral beat sullenly.
You see many women and girls going to work.
In the pale light. Wild from the night. Their skirts flutter.
Limbs made for love.
Into the machine and tedious labor.
Look into the tender light.
Into the tender green of the trees.
Listen! The sparrow is crying out.
And outside, in the wild fields,
larks are singing.


Mila Kunst and Lindner Project – Transart Institute – MFA and PhD Student Works – Summer 2014

Selected works from Mila Kunst Intermezzo #1

photography by Gabriela Gusmao

photographic works by Gabriela Gusmão

beautiful wooden floor inlay at Mila Kunst Gallery

Sylvia Adamcik2

photographic work by Sylvia Adamcik addressing our disjointed experience of the natural world

Sylvia Adamcik1

photographic work by Sylvia Adamcik

Drawing by Julia Hyde inspired by La Forêt de Soignes (The Healing Forest) in Belgium.

landscape painting by Christopher Huck

Selected works from Mila Kunst Intermezzo #3

sculpture by Lisa Osborn

sculpture by Lisa Osborn

Laurel Terlesky4

Installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky. Several women poignantly discuss the loss of their mothers and the gradual process of being able to grasp the finality of her passing away. For example, One woman remembers that took her two months to accept the fact that her mother was not just on vacation.

Laurel Terlesky6

Installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky

Laurel Terlesky8

Installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky

Laurel Terlesky7

Installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky

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Selected works from

Lindner Project Space

July 27, 2014

Lindner Project courtyard

Lindner Project Courtyard

Jamie Hamilton install

Jamie Hamilton book installation documenting his learning how to tightrope walk in New Mexico

Mikkel Niemann1

film installation by Mikkel Niemann. This film diptych explores man’s competition with nature. On the left we see the artist fighting with his opponent. On the right, he sits in an outdoor installation and films periodically over a period of time so that the imposition he has created in the environment is eventually completely overcome by the elements which tear away at the homey looking wallpaper and wild animals who come and eat his apples.

Mikkel Niemann2

Mikkel Niemann3

Lindner basement

remnants from a performance installation by Rosina Ivanova. The artist practiced a feat of strength and endurance by holding up weights, with both arms outstretched to her sides, for a long period of time. Occasionally, she rings an encouraging bell. She likens the experience to the efforts of travel and immigration. All the while, a boat travels through the water on the screen behind her to emphasize the connection.

Rosinas wts

Selected works from Lindner Project Space

Alternative Maternals

August 9th, 2014

a beautiful dance performance with a rocking chair about motherhood by Jeca Rodriguez

amongst other objects, book artist and Columbia College professor, Miriam Schaer displayed throughout the gallery, baby clothes embroidered with stinging quotes such as, “Your child is the best art work you have ever made. You don’t need to make any other art,” and “Your not having children is the biggest disappointment of our life. These clothes were put on baby dolls and photographed for her book, “The Presence of Their Absence”. To see more of her work, visit: http://miriamschaer.com/

a haunting performance, “The Maternal Line” by Valerie Walkerdine which is about learning to speak with ghosts by allowing them to have a way to speak, even if they do not exist, their memory still exists within us. Her work posits how art can help us what is being transmitted to us. How can we feel with the other as the womb conveys sound? She often uses threes in her work, for example a performance will begin with 1) a lost spirit not at peace,  2) entering the underworld as a half-being, 3) release. Her opening to this performance was to slowly walk through the gallery towards the winding staircase leading to the basement, all the while singing solemn atavistic sounds similar to Lisa Gerrard from Dead Can Dance. When she reaches the ground floor, a projection of close ups of dancers moving around on the ground is screened behind her. Suddenly, the image is flipped to look like they are crawling around on the ceiling. Valerie sings and shouts eerily as if in turmoil. A new scene forms and the focus is on a torso shot of a young woman in a red leotard being pushed back and forth between other dancers in black. They gradually work her into a frenzy until Valerie screams and pleads for it to STOP! STOP! The scene fades away into white with a blurred figure dancing there.  Now in a white leotard, Valerie dances in front of the screen, which creates strange juxtapositions between her brightly illuminated limbs and her silhouette. The mood lifts as she boisterously sings, a song about her Chiquita being sweeta, singing to her burro and how people will think her a fool.  She stated that she uses songs that are important to her mother and grandmother in her works, so maybe this playful song was one of their favorites.

photo collages created by Deborah Dudley  ~

Deborah Dudley

postcards from Brain Candy series by Deborah Dudley working in conjunction with her daughters


SomoS Gallery Berlin – Transart Institute MFA Students – Open Frame Popup Show

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid.

SomoS is on the 1st floor of corner building in the Kreuzberg neighborhood of Berlin. It is a large space flooded with soft natural light and a relaxing gathering room with bar in the back. The show on August 2, 2014 featured artists from 1st, 2nd, and graduating MFA classes, as well as, work from artists represented by tète gallery in the Prenzlauer Berg neighborhood. Putting work in the show was optional for students and were were asked to bring simple, fun works. First year students were told about the show shortly before it happened, so our work was either  made in Berlin or was work that had already been brought for presentations at school. Considering how impromptu it was, I think it turned rather well! Sadly, I did not get images of all the work in the show, but this is a sample.

SomoS bldg

SoMos corner

1st floor

SoMoS entry

SomoS buzzer

Here is the description of my piece (first of images below) which I created for the TI workshop, World as Sculpture. The assignment was to bring a sculptural artwork you have made but feel is not quite complete, then discuss how to make it more sculptural using modeling. I had previously made a set mixed CDs for a Leo friend in Los Angeles. I titled the compilations, The Moon and a Lantern for more mellow tracks and The Sun and a Lion for more upbeat tracks. The compilation titles were named specifically after the cover art illustrations I drew for them, using scribbled circles for the heavenly orbs and the origami folding line pattern for the object not seen in the drawing, but referenced in the title (lantern and lion). To see those images, visit: https://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Other-Illustration-and-Mixed-Media/G0000xdw0IFgWFaE/I0000qtO9L770Cqw/C00000PRsirHYLFo

and

https://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Other-Illustration-and-Mixed-Media/G0000xdw0IFgWFaE/I0000v75gIs.daRA/C00000PRsirHYLFo

  Along the same lines, I created this illustration created for a world music compilation I also selected the songs for. I infer three-dimensionality by layering origami fold lines for a pine tree on top of the world map image. In response to the exercise, I stated that to make it more sculptural, I would fold (model) the illustration into its intended shape. The pine tree can then be set upon the circular song list that normally lies under the CD, to transform from packaging design to sculptural artwork.

 

The Earth and a Pine Tree, CD compilation and foldable cover art by Stephanie Reid

Layered and cutout paper illustration of Earth with pine tree origami folding lines

Track list

The Earth and a Pine Tree, song selection and folded cover art

 

Lindy's painting

painting by Lindey Anderson

Lizs prints

prints by Liz Carré

Beauty Baco

positive film by Beau(ty) Baco

Ani

photo montage by Analia Sirabonian

translation = bad dog. This installation shows all the products the artist used to try to get the smell off of her dog after it had bothered a skunk.

translation = bad dog. This installation shows all the products the artist, Deborah Dudley, used to try to get the smell off of her dog after it had bothered a skunk.

marriage

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

back of dress

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

brides face

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

unraveling the marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

unraveling the marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

Marions rocks

gold painted lava rocks by Marion Wasserman

skeletal watercolors

watercolors by ? with ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Clare as Ivy

ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Creeping

ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Jayes drawings

mixed media works expressing a turbulent sibling relationship by Jaye Moscariello

Kelly

embroidery and oil on paper by Kelly Reyna Mackh, whose work expresses the experience of raising an autistic young son

KJs sign responses

markings by KJ Schumacher

remote crucifix

remote crucifix by ?

Nicolas Cage talk

Andrea Spaziani and Allen Ferguson talk Nicolas Cage

Ethiopian funerary robe

Ethiopian funerary robe installation by Konjit Seyoum

Asher and Konjit connect

Asher Mains and Konjit Seyoum share experiences relating to her installation

Gabriel's landscape

landscape print by Gabriel Deerman

Joses film still

film still by José Drummond

intentional water

Intentional Water by Honi Ryan

Honi and Abdul

Honi Ryan and Abdullah Khan review their notes after playing a relational game together

bar

SomoS bar

VW fun

colorful VW car outside the gallery


willows

willows on the Spree

Andrea Spaziani sent postcards to participants who had previously expressed interest in her community dance project. Each card had a one sentence description of a type of dance that could be performed. During the course of the opening at SomoS gallery in Berlin this summer, she performed her own versions of each instruction.

To end the night, attendees were treated to a live performance by Transart advisor, Lynn Book, of the Dada vocal sound piece Ursonate (primeval sonata) written and developed by Kurt Schwitter between 1922 and 1932. The poem was a favorite of Transart Institute co-founder, Klaus Knoll, who suddenly fell ill earlier this year and passed away just before the summer residency began. Book honored his memory by flawlessly guiding us through sublime and sometimes comical soundscape.


Berlin Gallery and Studio Tour – Summer 2014

During the Transart Institute MFA Summer Residency in Berlin, we were given insight into the art world there by going on a gallery and studio tour on July 26th. The tour was organized by the school’s Initiatives Coordinator, kate hers RHEE. This was an excellent way to begin the program. Most Berlin galleries set up at the major art fairs such as Cologne, Miami, Basel, and Hong Kong. All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid.

Gallery Tour

Gallery Stop 1: Esther Schipper

Exhibit: “Paper Work” featuring works by Ceal Floyer and Karin Sander created with office supplies. The former artist created a series of gradated circular ink blots make by pressing grey pens onto the center of blotting paper sheets until the pens are out of ink. Whereas the latter artist utilizes objects such as a hole punch, clips, or tabs on A4 paper to design patterns.

ink blot walls ink blots close ink blots wall

tabs walltabs seriestabs closeup

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Gallery Stop 2: Kühlhaus Berlin.

This is an approximately 18,000 sq feet historical building that was a cooling station before refrigerators were readily available. The courtyard in the photo below, with the whale hovering in the air, used to be a market and train station where people could come and buy foods that had been kept fresh in the kühlhaus. Several people recently purchased the warehouse for cultural activities and are remodeling the building to code, for example, by building cement stairs vs. wooden ones. The Berlin Art Prize, an annual art competition between local contemporary artists, was held at the Kühlhaus earlier this year.

However, the four-story exhibition on display while we were there was of student works from the school of high art, Kunsthochschule Berlin Weissensee in the GDR (German Democratic Republic), or East Germany. It was explained that arts funding is highly competitive since the conjoining of East and West Germany because now there are two major art schools in Berlin, the other being Akademie der Künste, in the West, which has a history going back to the 1600’s. None of the works had labels, therefore I am unable to provide the names of the artists whose works are shown here, except for a sculptural installation in front of the building which is the result of a performance given by Elena Kaludova. Elena wore a t-shirt with the slogan “STOP BORING ART!” printed on the back so that it could be read as she drilled holes through the wooden sign. The sign had the words “BORING ART” carved out of it. The artist drilled through most of the letters until only the “O” and “R” were left intact.

construction Kuhlhaus facade

drive thru gate scriptfloating whale


Boring Art

plant elementals

old technology landscape2

old technology landscape

cassette deck with joystick

strips montage

light and dark

grass drawing

musical drawing

musical drawing closeup

bird lady full

bird lady

embroidery

embroidery closeup colored glass projection

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Gallery Stop 3: Schwarz Contemporary run by Ann Schwarz

This exhibit was of works by several artists represented by the gallery.

Schwarz Contemporary

Monika Goetz_2200 K

Postcard of outdoor installation, 2200 K, by Monika Goetz

cyanotype

photograph of paper by Holger Neihaus

pink paper

painting by Fee Kleiss (left) and photo of paper by Holger Neihaus (right)

spray paint on nylon

delicate “stencil” paintings on white kite fabric by Henrik Eiben

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Gallery Stop 4: Wentrup Galerie by Jan Wentrup

 The gallery currently represents 13 artists. Works by several of those artists were on display.

Wentrup

Main gallery - Axel Geis's photo realistic chandeliers painted from different angles on highly glossed canvases. The viewer stands in the middle where the light fixture would normally be so that the experience of the installation refers to itself.

Main gallery – Axel Geis’s photo realistic chandeliers painted from different angles on highly glossed canvases. The viewer stands in the middle where the light fixture would normally be so that the subject and object are reversed. How strange to be scrutinized by a light fixture! This is an excellent example of “assemblage” mentioned in the World as Scuplture Workshop section of my post here: https://haikuflash.wordpress.com/2014/09/23/course-sampler-transart-institute-mfa-and-certificate-summer-residency-2014/

Gregor Hildebrandt creates many of his artworks from cassette tapes. In some cases, as with this piece, he glues the tape to a canvas and before peeling the audio tape back off again, he applies pressure through footsteps, scratching, etc, so that the emulsion stays on the canvas where he has effected it. Those works are names after the music that was recorded on that tape, which he was most likely listening to while making his marks on them. This one is titled “Neues vom Trickser (Toco) IV” by the band Tocotronic.

Gregor Hildebrandt creates many of his artworks from cassette tapes. In some cases, as with this piece, he glues the tape to a canvas and before peeling the audio tape back off again, he applies pressure through footsteps, scratching, etcetera, so that the emulsion stays on the canvas where he has effected it. Those works are named after the music that was recorded on the tape. This one is titled “Neues vom Trickser (Toco) IV” by the band Tocotronic.

Gregor Hildebrandt creates many of his artworks from cassette tapes. In this case, he cut still frames from movies into small rectangles that will fit inside of cassette case spines. The image here is from “Eyes Wide Shut”.

Another piece by Gregor Hildebrandt. In this work, he cut a print of a still frame from the movie “Eyes Wide Shut” into small rectangles that fit inside of cassette case spines then displayed them in a wall organizer.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. A photograph of marble is used as paper mâché landscape on another cement sheet.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. The artists are then creating copies of copies to a microscopic level. The replicative nature of their work can then be described as sculptural as discussed in my World as Sculpture Workshop blog linked above. Here, a photograph of marble is used as a paper mâché landscape onto a cement sheet.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. A photograph of marble is used as paper mâché landscape on another cement sheet.

another angle of the Peles Empire slab

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. After using photographic images as wallpaper on cement sheets, layers appear to be torn away to reveal another texture and shade underneath.

Here photographic images of Peles Castle are used as wallpaper on cement sheets. Layers appear to be torn away to reveal another texture and/or image underneath.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. After using photographic images as wallpaper on cement sheets, layers appear to be torn away to reveal another texture and shade underneath.

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Studio Tour

HB 55 (Herzbergstrasse 55) Räume der kunst (rooms of art). This historical set of buildings used to be a margarine factory.

HB55 Räume der Kunst

1909margarine factoryKunstfabrik studios

1) Aleks Slota was our tour guide and has a studio here. He explained that he uses a megaphone to recite speeches that were written but never read, out of his studio window. One example was the speech written in case the U.S. astronauts never returned from their first trip to the moon.

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2) Art photographer, Ivonne Thein, makes commentary on the fashion world and beauty, sometimes through jarring imagery. http://www.ivonnethein.com/

wisps

from Ivonne Thein’s Thirty-two Kilos series

toothache

from Ivonne Thein’s Thirty-two Kilos series

faceless

from the Second Skin series
plastic and human

video of a woman dressing into and undressing from a second skin

video of a woman dressing into and undressing from a flesh colored body suit

A hidden camera behind the black box on the wall projects a light portrait of the person standing in front of it, rendering them indistinguishable.

A hidden camera behind the black box on the wall displays a live action, out of focus video of the person standing in front of it, thus rendering them indistinguishably.

postcard from Ivonne Thein’s Proforma series which appears to be human bodies seamlessly joined with mannequin heads or possibly just their faces. This is the most subtle and effective commentary on airbrushing / Photoshopping models that I’ve seen to date.

Her work was one of the primary inspirations for my first post-graduation project, Dissolve, here: https://haikuflash.wordpress.com/2016/07/15/a-collection-of-photography-on-the-theme-imperceptible-self/

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3) Louise Gibson is a sculptress from Scotland currently working in Berlin at a studio near a scrapyard. She recycles discarded clothing and electronics by embedding them in resin castings, then when dry, she cuts them into shapes. She also melts, morphs, and varnishes large appliances and building materials into blobs of color and sheen (see bottom shelf in image below). trio

jeans

faux fur

green fabric

plaid

purples

filled boots melted appliances  fuse boxes

resin windowThe Clawsunflowers zink und kabel  stoves fence

scrapyard and students colorful scraps

 


The Last Enchanted Forest Easter

forest-friends

In my mind, the Enchanted Forest will forever be the heart and soul of Austin, a secret landscape in the middle of South Austin where artists, musicians, dancers, teachers, and mind explorers from all over the world have come to commune for over a decade. I remembered entering the forest in the fall of 2005, in response to their spray-painted-sign-on-a-sheet calling for help with the annual Haunted Trail event. Halloween is my favorite holiday and I’d been itching to be an actor in a haunted house for years. I’m always the one in the front of my line, blocking and dodging demons so my screaming friends can get by, so I figured I’d be good at scaring people, too.

I’d just moved to South Lamar and the Enchanted Forest, Zilker, Flipnotics, and my workplace, the Dougherty Art School were all within an easy bike ride away. My rent was $399 including giant community gardens in the courtyards. So, I rolled over there on my imitation BMX from the junkyard and took them up on their friendly invitation. The volunteers had convened inside a patio and I recognized some people I knew. Baruzula, a legendary Austin fire spinner, textile, and body artist and Johnny Slug, another well known character in town, who was a DJ at my favorite early 90’s industrial and electronic music club, Ohms. Hurricane Katrina had just brought many refugees to Austin and several street performers and musicians from New Orleans were staying at the forest in tents. I imagine this made the environment even more circus-like and stimulating than it already was. Plus, a Cajun cook was ready and willing to prepare delicious food for everyone!

For the next few weeks we prepared to freak people out. The event ran for a few weekends and I got to be four different characters. Some of the highlights were as follows. Imagine walking through a pitch black tunnel in the Forest at night, someone may or may not jump out at you, but either way you rush to get back into the moonlight. When you emerge, a path leads you to stepping stones over the stream towards a shack where a country woman is rocking herself on the porch. As you get closer, you see shelves of apothecary jars containing formaldehyde and creepy looking things, bones, claws, and innards. She stands up and you can see it is a man disguised in a straw bonnet and dress, sharpening two large knife blades together, beckoning you, blood curdling wailing and pleas for help come from behind the shack. As he/she walks towards you with the knives and you scurry down the path, from the direction you are heading, a shirtless man with piercings and scarification covering his chest and a white haired, twisted faced mask starts his chainsaw chases you shrieking down the path…You stroll along and catch your breath as you walk upon an alter attached to a tree in the middle of the path. A shelf is nailed to the tree to hold voodoo baby dolls, dead roses, and other manner of eerie accoutréments. The two trees flanking the alter tree hold two scarecrows. Beyond the trees is another wooden shack. Reluctantly you creep towards the building as the path goes through the entrance door and out the exit door, which you can see from where you stand. Suddenly a deep growling voice calls you by name and demands to know, “What are you doing here?!!!” You hear, “Get off of my property!” as one of the scarecrows leaps from the tree and continues to angrily berate you as it edges you into the dark tiny house. A bathtub full of blood awaits and a reanimated corpse of a girl emerges. You jump to the other side of the room and slink towards the exit as she beseeches you with outstretched dripping bloody arms and hands to come closer and bring her favorite toy with you. She cries like a dead-eyed doll as you leave without appeasing her. You soon encounter a John Wayne Gacy look-alike in a black light illuminated tent spray painted with fluorescent obscenities. You block out what happens inside and emerge feeling as if your consciousness has just blacked out temporarily. You almost forget you are on a haunted trail until you come upon a skeletal witch doctor with shrunken heads, toadstools, and a steamy cauldron that she wants you to stir. She seems harmless enough so you allow her to coax you into assisting her. She tells you story but never finishes because in mid-sentence the cauldron tips over to reveal a heathen man grabbing at your ankles to pull you into his pit of despair. They both cackle and curse as you get away by running across a metal bridge passing over the creek. When you are halfway across, a troll bangs on the underside of it with a hammer, which almost give you a heart attack! Just as you cross over, a human sized raven jumps out from behind a tree, croaking menacingly at you for waking it up. It practically pushed you out of it’s territory and you see the exit is near, but one last dreamy surprise awaits you before you make it to the end…A stilt-walker in large billed bird mask tries to envelop you in its shroud so you can never leave.

It was the best haunted production I’ve ever seen and it was a total blast. I never knew I could do those things with my voice. I scared myself a little as I played a tortured girl behind the shack, the scarecrow, undead girl in the tub, and raven.

Halloween parties were hosted for days. Shows consisted of fire, hula hoop, and Butoh style dancing. A suspension ritual from a high tree was undertaken by the Cajun cook. Vaudeville musicians and jugglers in black and white stripes made us laugh. DJs spun as we danced under the stars in our costumes…til the next event…

Art Outside, the festival now held in Apache Pass, Texas was started right there at the Enchanted Forest on Oltorf. In the spring, the spooky took a backseat the fresh ideas and collaborative efforts of artists all over town. Installations, bands, and food sampling were sprinkled throughout the woods for guests to enjoy in the dappled sunlight. At night, mysterious Baruzaland shadow puppet shows were presented on a giant screen with live instrumental accompaniment. Afterwards a lively dance party broke out as, The Emeralds, a rambunctious surf punk outfit who were visiting from Japan, rocked the stage.

I only experienced the Forest for a short while, but those were my favorite months in Austin. The Enchanted Forest was the last bastion of free spirits in our beloved town before it became what I see it as now, a pretty big city. Shortly after my time in the Forest, I ran off to Paris with one of the French NOLA refugees and then to live in Asia for three years. When I returned to Austin, it was shockingly different than it had been in the past 15 years I had lived here. It took me a very long time to find a full time job, despite knowing people all over town, and rent prices were unfathomable to me. I considered going back overseas, but my family of friends are here and I didn’t want to lose touch with my home for any longer than I already had. I made the decision to tough it out because although it’s getting more crowded and expensive, the arts are still alive here. Culture and nature are still valued. It just doesn’t feel as loose and free-spirited…especially now that the Enchanted Forest must close its gates. We fear for the trees and the water there. We are sad that the wildflowers will lose yet another patch of soil to grow as it wills. The birds will still be able to perch in the heritage oaks though. It would be illegal for the new owners to cut down hundreds of years old trees in Austin. (See https://www.austintreeexperts.com/blog/austin-heritage-tree-ordinanace/)

Since I returned from my sojourn, friends of the Forest, including myself, met with city officials, trade members, and community spokespeople, to try to come up with a plan to continue hosting events without getting fined by the city for code violations of this or that sort. The expense of readying it was too much and the property taxes got too high. The most generous proprietor, Albert tried to find a non-profit or community organization to purchase the land, but none could pay a price to sustain him and his family. He has grandchildren now and is planning to start a small farm just a short drive out of town. Eventually he agreed to sell it to developers, who could afford to pay the price he needed for his next chapter. So despite the loss, we are happy that his lovely family’s future is still bright.

And so it goes…I spent the evening of the last Enchanted Forest Easter in this gem of a green space. To allow the forest creatures to convene in the forest one last time, the Forest family threw a big Easter party. I didn’t arrive until nearly sundown, as bunnies are wont to do, but I could tell from the crushed cascarones and confetti strewn about everywhere, that it had been a huge success. Rowdy children wanted to smash watermelon rabbits as if they were pumpkins. Adults lolled around on a bright AstroTurf blanket pleased with the perfect temperature and absence of mosquitoes. I said goodbye to old friend wishing it a positive future as I wandered through with Himalayan protection incense, ring

Now the hardest part comes. Even those who don’t live in the Forest, but are sensitive to its presence, will have a grieving period as bulldozers and concrete take it over. For those who do live there, it must be agonizing. I see in their eyes that they are still trying to release it, some with more ease than others. We have to get used to the fact that Austin will never be the same as it was pre-2006. Many of the people, such as artists, craftspeople, restaurant workers, and gardeners, who made this city appealing to the people who moved here in the past 1-5 years, are getting pushed further and further away from the center. Rents are just too high now. Wages are not getting higher congruently. Many jobs for artists are now being done with free labor known as the unpaid internship. We are not able to make a living in our fields as easily as we were able to before. However, there is a lot of talk lately by the city and grassroots organizations about getting more affordable housing for artists and musicians, initiating rent control, and putting regulations on unpaid internships because what will Austin become if we can’t live here anymore?

This is a call to all who value community, culture, art, music, poetry, nature, health, and good food to be sure you are nurturing those treasures as often as possible. Teach people, who are not familiar with their value, to open themselves up. Welcome them. Show them there is a way to be free. Let the spirit of the Enchanted Forest infiltrate the city, so that the healing powers of creativity and authenticity rule the great city of Austin, Texas y’all!

 

 

 


Floral Art

These floral art pieces were created from plants I grew in my garden. They were meant to accompany the photo scrolls I created earlier this year, but nature has it’s own timing, no matter how well we try to schedule things.

They are inspired by amazing floral artists around the world, who showcase their work

in the compilation http://www.floralannual.com/

Panda Face Ginger AKA Asarum maximum 'Ling Ling' (Hexastylis) for the horticulture experts out there, under a shoot of maidenhair fern, flanked by black mondo grass. Ceramic vases by Lucy Lenoir.

Panda Resting Under a Gingko Tree…Panda Face Ginger AKA Asarum maximum ‘Ling Ling’ (Hexastylis) for the horticulture experts out there, under a shoot of maidenhair fern, flanked by black mondo grass. Ceramic vases by Lucy Lenoir.

I built an Ikoso globe, disassembled part of it, then partially buried it in dirt. After five morning glory seedlings sprouted, I transplanted them in this bowl shaped pot with the globe. In the center of the pot, I embedded three test tubes with caps. When the vine displayed the amazing flowers here, I uncapped the tubes poured in water and placed a chrysanthemum from an ikebana class and some baby’s breath from the florist down the road.

Egrets Soaring Over Snowy Clifftop Under a Full Moon….Sagisou, egret grass, is the Japanese name for these bog orchids which grow in the wild there. Here, I placed the long stem near a black lava rock covered with Euphorbia ‘diamond frost’ petals.

Halloween Pumpkin Toads…These tiny Toad Lily ‘Raspberry Mousse’ blooms began appearing in October. The only fitting companion for them was an pumpkin orange Gerbera Daisy. I digitally embedded them with the platter they were resting on, which I shot from a different angle and rim lighting to look like a portal opening inside of a dark moon. Happy Halloween Everyone!


Solo Show

ImageImage


A Labyrinth of Light

For about one week, The Architects of Air – Luminaria, a traveling chapel of sorts touched ground in Austin, Texas. On the outside it looks like a futuristic fun house. On the inside, another world where tunnels of color bathe the senses in a variety of vibrations. Upon entering, visitors waited under a dome primarily of red. Pulse rates increased, faces softened, eyes darkened. We began to feel the heat of the sunlight trapped inside the PVC structure. The excitement was beginning. After a brief orientation, we entered a room filled with green. The transition took us aback. We all stumbled a bit and felt like we were suddenly underwater. A boy whispered in awe, “I feel like I’m dreaming.” Indeed, from that point on, we felt like we were transported into a fantasy. Visitors lay inside of it’s sloping walls meditating on the striped ceilings and hues blending as they draped the corridors. We all swayed as the wind outside and walkers within rocked the walls to and fro. As a photographer, I felt that the straightforward images were amazing documentation of this genius work of art, but didn’t quite capture the disorienting feeling of being there. Spinning, twisting, and panning finally told the story I was experiencing – being inside the heart of a flower.

 http://www.architects-of-air.com/

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Grackle vs. Parrot and other fun…

…at Butler Park and the Dougherty Art School.

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To see the student’s shadow puppet shows, visit:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwO9tqnS9Jo&context=C35b6db2ADOEgsToPDskL6ekVKS7_auBKlRdG5JCqg

and

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ySleWiYxso&context=C3595e89ADOEgsToPDskI2PlB-trkR7NfTYVxeCiYA


Ode to Cy (April 25, 1928 – July 5, 2011)

With a name like Cy Twombly, it seems like destiny that he made scribble art.

Mine, in honor of him, were made with pens purposely left open in my purse with a pad of paper, and my wallet, to draw on when I moved.

Confusing Man in the Coastal Wind

Concerto for Viola

Fuzzies at Vesper

Seahorses


Spaces Between – An art show by Teruko Nimura

Teruko Nimura opened her solo show, ‘Spaces Between’, at Testsite this Sunday. Not only was the show lovely and fun, but the gallery space is gorgeous.

These images are teasers to encourage you to visit the exhibit in person. Not all the works are included here, so you have to go there to see them.

http://www.fluentcollab.org/testsite/index.php/projects/index/27


HaikuFlash seeks exposure…Drum roll please…

The Dougherty Art Center has graciously offered HaikuFlash a two-person show with Kendra Kinsey for June 2012.

In the meanwhile, I am seeking grants and exhibitions for Austin and beyond.

The latest proposal was sent to Women and Their Work. I think by next week they will have made their decisions for 2012.


Welcome to HaikuFlash

 Like haiku (my favorite form of poetry), my work is heavily influenced by nature.

Therefore, a “haiku flash” is what I call a poetic moment or vision that inspires the artist in me.

This is a blog for all things creative. I hope that you will join in the fun!