a blog about poetic creativity*******************ALL IMAGES © Stephanie Reid for HaikuFlash

Painting

Su Casa es Mi Casa

Some shots from the juried exhibit, Gimme Shelter, at Columbia City Gallery in Seattle, where I am showing my project, Su Casa es Mi Casa (video and building cards). According to the gallery’s website, Gimme Shelter “speaks to the many types of dislocation happening in society today both locally and internationally. Artists working in 2D, 3D and video address issues of homelessness, gentrification and refugee dislocation.”

My project focuses on twelve meandering months of sacrificing stability to focus on art by completing an MFA, showing work abroad, having difficulty trying to find employment during school and after graduation, and thus also trying to find a long term residence, especially where rising rent costs are prohibitive. Here, 26 surfaces slept in during that time are the focal point. Some while house sitting, dog sitting, renting cheap rooms briefly, or visiting far away friends.

The images are rendered in impermanent media in a style touching on the vulnerability and fragility of a dollhouse, yet in some cases are also reminiscent of an interior blueprint. They are primarily recollections from memory vs. photographic representations. Therefore, the room renderings are wrought with inaccuracies and omissions. Words are imperceptible in the disorienting layered monologue which ponders the meaning of “home” for someone who has accepted nomadism and expansion through travel and creativity over domesticity, yet longs for a place to settle down. The disquieting incompleteness and constant change provides comfort through spaciousness and balances the alternative by thwarting staleness. On the other hand, constant movement is contrary to the stillness needed to support long term goals. Therefore, balance must be found between the two, just as it is required to build a house of cards. The concentration, energy, and persistence needed to succeed during this period of transition is apparent in the tension of the monologue and motion of the builder and camera operators, Stephanie Reid and Todd Rychener.

Camera operation: Stephanie Reid and Todd Rychener
Illustrations, Direction, and Editing by Stephanie Reid

Video: https://vimeo.com/221571137

Detailed images of the cards: http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery/Su-Casa-es-Mi-Casa/G0000UW0W15mhFLE/C0000nFrmMwTH.y4


Mila Kunst and Lindner Project – Transart Institute – MFA and PhD student works – Summer 2014

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid.

Selected works from Mila Kunst Intermezzo #1

photography by Gabriela Gusmao

photographic works by Gabriela Gusmão

beautiful wooden floor inlay at Mila Kunst Gallery

 

Sylvia Adamcik2

photographic work by Sylvia Adamcik

Sylvia Adamcik1

photographic work by Sylvia Adamcik

drawing by Julia Hyde inspired by La Forêt de Soignes (The Healing Forest) in Belgium

 

landscape painting by Christopher Huck

 

Selected works from Mila Kunst Intermezzo #3

sculpture by Lisa Osborn

sculpture by Lisa Osborn

Laurel Terlesky4

installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky. Several women poignantly discuss the loss of their mothers and the gradual process of being able to grasp the finality of their passing away.

Laurel Terlesky6

installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky. Several women poignantly discuss the loss of their mothers and the gradual process of being able to grasp the finality of their passing away.

Laurel Terlesky8

installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky. Several women poignantly discuss the loss of their mothers and the gradual process of being able to grasp the finality of their passing away.

Laurel Terlesky7

installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky. Several women poignantly discuss the loss of their mothers and the gradual process of being able to grasp the finality of their passing away.

 

Selected works from

Lindner Project Space

July 27, 2014

Lindner Project courtyard

Lindner Project Courtyard

Jamie Hamilton install

Jamie Hamilton book installation documenting his learning how to tightrope walk in New Mexico

Mikkel Niemann1

film installation by Mikkel Niemann. This film diptych explores man’s competition with nature. On the left we see the artist fighting with his opponent. On the right, he sits in an outdoor installation and films periodically over a period of time so that the imposition he has created in the environment is eventually completely overcome by the elements which tear away at the homey looking wallpaper and wild animals who come and eat his apples.

Mikkel Niemann2

film installation by Mikkel Niemann. This film diptych explores man’s competition with nature. On the left we see the artist fighting with his opponent. On the right, he sits in an outdoor installation and films periodically over a period of time so that the imposition he has created in the environment is eventually completely overcome by the elements which tear away at the homey looking wallpaper and wild animals who come and eat his apples.

Mikkel Niemann3

film installation by Mikkel Niemann. This film diptych explores man’s competition with nature. On the left we see the artist fighting with his opponent. On the right, he sits in an outdoor installation and films periodically over a period of time so that the imposition he has created in the environment is eventually completely overcome by the elements which tear away at the homey looking wallpaper and wild animals who come and eat his apples.

Lindner basement

remnants from a performance installation by Rosina Ivanova. The artist practiced a feat of strength and endurance by holding up weights, with both arms outstretched to her sides, for a long period of time. Occasionally, she rings an encouraging bell. She likens the experience to the efforts of travel and immigration. All the while, a boat travels through the water on the screen behind her to emphasize the connection.

Rosinas wts

remnants from a performance installation by Rosina Ivanova. The artist practiced a feat of strength and endurance by holding up weights, with both arms outstretched to her sides, for a long period of time. Occasionally, she rings an encouraging bell. She likens the experience to the efforts of travel and immigration. All the while, a boat travels through the water on the screen behind her to emphasize the connection.

Selected works from Lindner Project Space

Alternative Maternals

August 9th, 2014

a beautiful dance performance with a rocking chair about motherhood by Jeca Rodriguez

amongst other objects, book artist and Columbia College professor, Miriam Schaer displayed throughout the gallery, baby clothes embroidered with stinging quotes such as, “Your child is the best art work you have ever made. You don’t need to make any other art,” and “Your not having children is the biggest disappointment of our life. These clothes were put on baby dolls and photographed for her book, “The Presence of Their Absence”. To see more of her work, visit: http://miriamschaer.com/

a haunting performance, “The Maternal Line” by Valerie Walkerdine which is about learning to speak with ghosts by allowing them to have a way to speak, even if they do not exist, their memory still exists within us. Her work posits how art can help us what is being transmitted to us. How can we feel with the other as the womb conveys sound? She often uses threes in her work, for example a performance will begin with 1) a lost spirit not at peace,  2) entering the underworld as a half-being, 3) release. Her opening to this performance was to slowly walk through the gallery towards the winding staircase leading to the basement, all the while singing solemn atavistic sounds similar to Lisa Gerrard. When she reaches the ground floor, a projection of close ups of dancers moving around on the ground is screened behind her. Suddenly, the image is flipped to look like they are crawling around on the ceiling. Valerie sings and shouts eerily as if in turmoil. A new scene forms and the focus is on a torso shot of a young woman in a red leotard being pushed back and forth between other dancers in black. They gradually work her into a frenzy until Valerie screams and pleads for it to STOP! STOP! The scene fades away into white with a blurred figure dancing there.  Now in a white leotard, Valerie dances in front of the screen, which creates strange juxtapositions between her brightly illuminated limbs and her silhouette. The mood lifts as she boisterously sings, a song about her Chiquita being sweeta, singing to her burro and how people will think her a fool.  She stated that she uses songs that are important to her mother and grandmother in her works, so maybe this playful song was one of their favorites.

photo collages created by Deborah Dudley  ~

Deborah Dudley

postcards from Brain Candy series by Deborah Dudley working in conjunction with her daughters


Hamburger Banhof Museum, Berlin – July 31, 2014

Hamburger Banhof facad

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid

We didn’t see the entire museum, but instead spent a good deal of time in the upstairs film installation room and the following exhibition:

The End of the 20th Century. The Best Is Yet to Come. A Dialogue with the Marx Collection (part of the museum’s permanent collection from Erich Marx)

Warhol of Joseph Beuys with diamond dust

Landscape of Beuys’s basalt sculptures

a giant Mao painting against Mao wallpaper in a room of violent images – Elvis with guns, electric chairs, knives, a car accident death, pointy-toed spiked-heeled pumps

Warhols Mao

 A film room 1920 William Kentridge from South Africa “Journey to the Moon” brought back to mind the films that inspired me to begin film making in the early 90’s. Special effects in the pre-digital era required a great deal of experimentation and imagination. Almost a century later, they are still effective as poetic storytelling devices. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPf63b6Glz8

A variety of Rauschenberg’s works such as Pink Door, Mule Deer, and collage prints described by John Cage as looking at several TV screens, on different channels, simultaneously

A Cy Twombly room featured several works including “The School of Fontainebleau” and “I am Thyrsis of Etna”, but my favorite of his works being shown was, “Empire of Flora” with its exciting treatment and colors of flowers. It has the sense of playing in a garden, getting ones hands dirty, pulling weeds, bumblebees, blooms and water streaming from a hose.

Full Empire Cy floral Cy signature Empire of Flora

This wing ended in an Anselm Kiefer gallery where the astounding “Lilith amroten Meer” commanded serious attention but only after visiting his less weighty work “Ways of Worldly Wisdom: Armenius’s Battle” on the side wall.

Lilith am roten Meertiny dressLilith textLilith backing detail Lilith cement detail

Ways of Worldly Wisdom

 

Rachel Whitereed – Untitled with Thomas Struth – San Zaccharia time lapse photograph

Whiteread and Struth

ceiling detail neon

The last exhibition we visited was the reason we came to the museum that day. Our film teacher, Anna Faroqhi, had to bow out of instructing our film workshop because her father, the film essayist, Harun Farocki, had died during the residency just a couple of days before the class was scheduled. We wanted to honor his memory by going to see his exhibition. The Hamburger Banhof was showing several of his works at the time, so instead of class we went to see some of his projects. On either side of the viewing room entrance two small monitors, and a viewing bench with headphones, invited visitors to relax and take in the show. However, the first essay was “Inextinguishable Fire”, a disquieting reenactment of the development of napalm at the Dow Chemical Plant and the atrocities committed by its use. **WATCH AT YOUR OWN RISK. It gets a gory: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JBbgWSBTdA

That foyer lead to a large room with four screens staggered throughout and showing the shorts from his, “Serious Games” series. These films explore different phases of soldier training from video game simulation, a live action simulation which took place in a small fabricated village with actors pretending to be the inhabitants, the creation of the video games, and post traumatic distress therapy. I found the post traumatic distress therapy to be useful in developing a conversation to have with my teenage brother should he still be considering joining the military.

Upon exiting, a compilation segments of at least three of films could be filmed on the other monitor. of his 1995 film “Interface”  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsA5E5qIgm4 , which gives a first hand look at how the artist worked in his editing room while comparing and contrasting film and video; “Workers Leaving the Factory in Eleven Decades” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPGSmvtmaWY, which touches on the historical uses of the factory as a control mechanism for the population; and “zwischen zwei Kriegen” (between two wars), which can be ordered along with his other works at the online video data bank http://www.vdb.org/artists/harun-farocki. I urge you to take some time to familiarize yourself with the catalogue of this prolific artist and eloquent, insightful writer.


SomoS Gallery Berlin – Transart Institute MFA Students – Open Frame Popup Show

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid.

SomoS is on the 1st floor of corner building in the Kreuzberg neighborhood of Berlin. It is a large space flooded with soft natural light and a relaxing gathering room with bar in the back. The show on August 2, 2014 featured artists from 1st, 2nd, and graduating MFA classes, as well as, work from artists represented by tète gallery in the Prenzlauer Berg neighborhood. Putting work in the show was optional for students and were were asked to bring simple, fun works. First year students were told about the show shortly before it happened, so our work was either  made in Berlin or was work that had already been brought for presentations at school. Considering how impromptu it was, I think it turned rather well! Sadly, I did not get images of all the work in the show, but this is a sample.

SomoS bldg

SoMos corner

1st floor

SoMoS entry

SomoS buzzer

Here is the description of my piece (first of images below) which I created while I was in Berlin:

This drawing is from a series of scribble circle drawings, which began from an exhibit poster I created for my friends and I in The Yeah! Club Collectiph. The theme was to submit works made within 16 Seconds. The exhibit space was called Big Red Sun. To mirror the theme of the show, I scribbled a warm colored vortex symbolic of an experience I had while staring into the sun and it transformed into a portal. During the show, I created two other scribble circle drawings by only using each color for 16 seconds or less. To see those pieces, click below:

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Print-Graphics/G00007.A1XiQpiVg/I0000X6maOvNIox8/C0000wALAFGzPypk

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/ILLUSTRATION-MIXED-MEDIA/G0000l2uM6IqJSgc/I0000afXvtIIaZIQ

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/ILLUSTRATION-MIXED-MEDIA/G0000l2uM6IqJSgc/I0000HciXbIomPR4

 This piece called “The Earth and A Pine Tree” is the third in a group of covers created for compilation CDs, which I carefully selected songs for. This 2D series converges with 3D when one imagines the overlaid origami patterns folded to change the paper from the flat to the multi-dimensional. The other pieces are called “The Sun and A Lion” (for a Leo)  and “The Moon and a Lantern”. To see those pieces, click below:

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/ILLUSTRATION-MIXED-MEDIA/G0000l2uM6IqJSgc/I0000v75gIs.daRA

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/ILLUSTRATION-MIXED-MEDIA/G0000l2uM6IqJSgc/I0000qtO9L770Cqw

 

The Earth and a Pine Tree, CD compilation and foldable cover art by Stephanie Reid

Layered and cutout paper illustration of Earth with pine tree origami folding lines

Track list

The Earth and a Pine Tree, song selection and folded cover art

 

Lindy's painting

painting by Lindey Anderson

Lizs prints

prints by Liz Carré

Beauty Baco

positive film by Beau(ty) Baco

Ani

photo montage by Analia Sirabonian

translation = bad dog. This installation shows all the products the artist used to try to get the smell off of her dog after it had bothered a skunk.

translation = bad dog. This installation shows all the products the artist, Deborah Dudley, used to try to get the smell off of her dog after it had bothered a skunk.

marriage

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

back of dress

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

brides face

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

groom profile

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

unraveling the marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

unraveling the marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

brushwork

I have forgotten whose this is at the moment 😦 but I really like it. I will post the artist’s name as soon as it is revealed to me.

Marions rocks

gold painted lava rocks by Marion Wasserman

skeletal watercolors

watercolors by ? with ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Clare as Ivy

ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Creeping

ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Jayes drawings

mixed media by Jaye Moscariello with ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Kelly

embroidery and oil on paper by Kelly Reyna Mackh

KJs sign responses

markings by KJ Schumacher

remote crucifix

remote crucifix by ?

Nicolas Cage talk

Andrea Spaziani and Allen Ferguson talk Nicolas Cage

Ethiopian funerary robe

Ethiopian funerary robe installation by Konjit Seyoum

Asher and Konjit

Asher Mains and Konjit Seyoum share experiences relating to her installation

Asher and Konjit connect

Asher Mains and Konjit Seyoum share experiences relating to her installation

mixed media by Robyn Thomas

mixed media by Robyn Thomas

Gabriel's landscape

landscape print by Gabriel Deerman

Joses film still

film still by José Drummond

intentional water

Intentional Water by Honi Ryan

Honi and Abdullah

Honi Ryan and Abdullah Khan review their notes after playing a relational game together

Honi and Abdul

Honi Ryan and Abdullah Khan review their notes after playing a relational game together

bar

SomoS bar

VW fun

colorful VW car outside the gallery

 https://vimeo.com/106879231willows

willows on the Spree

 Video footage of performances by Andrea Spaziani and Lynn Book can be seen at the links below. *Please excuse the flicker, I have never experienced that issue before. I either need to adjust the firmware on my camera or adjust the frame rate during filming in Europe next time!

Andrea sent postcards to participants who had previously expressed interest in her community dance project. Each card had a one sentence description of a type of dance that could be performed. During the course of the opening at SomoS gallery in Berlin this summer, she performed her own versions of each instruction. Here is a short clip illustrating one example. https://vimeo.com/106878394

Attendees were treated to a live performance by Transart advisor, Lynn Book, of the Dada vocal sound piece Ursonate (primeval sonata) written and developed by Kurt Schwitter between 1922 and 1932. The poem was a favorite of Transart Institute co-founder, Klaus Knoll, who suddenly fell ill earlier this year and passed away just before the summer residency began. Book honored his memory by flawlessly guiding us through sublime and comical terrains. I was captivated throughout the journey. To see an excerpt, visit: https://vimeo.com/106879231


Berlin Gallery and Studio Tour – Summer 2014

During the Transart Institute MFA Summer Residency in Berlin, we were given insight into the art world there by going on a gallery tour on July 26th. The tour was organized by the school’s Initiatives Coordinator, kate hers RHEE. This was an excellent way to begin the program. Most Berlin galleries set up at the major art fairs such as Cologne, Miami, Basel, and Hong Kong. Feel free to report to me any errors in this post. All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid.

Gallery Tour

Gallery Stop 1: Esther Schipper

Exhibit: “Paper Work” featuring works by Ceal Floyer and Karin Sander created with office supplies. The former artist created a series of gradated circular ink blots make by pressing grey pens onto the center of blotting paper sheets until the pens are out of ink. Whereas the latter artist utilizes objects such as a hole punch, clips, or tabs on A4 paper to make patterns.

ink blot walls ink blots close ink blots wall

tabs walltabs seriestabs closeup

 

 

 

Gallery Stop 2: Kühlhaus Berlin.

This is an approximately 18,000 sq feet historical building that was a cooling station before refrigerators were readily available. The courtyard in the photo below, with the whale hovering in the air, used to be a market and train station where people could come and buy foods that had been kept fresh in the kühlhaus. Several people recently purchased the warehouse for cultural activities and are remodeling the building to code, such as making cement stairs. The Berlin Art Prize, an annual art competition between local contemporary artists, was held at the Kühlhaus earlier this year.

Exhibit: Four floors of the gallery contained student works from the school of high art, Kunsthochschule Berlin Weissensee in the GDR (German Democratic Republic), or East Germany. It was explained that arts funding is highly competitive since the conjoining of East and West Germany because now there are two major art schools in Berlin, the other being Akademie der Künste, in the west, which has a history going back to the 1600’s. None of the works had labels, therefore I am unable to provide the names of the artists whose works are shown here, except for a sculptural installation in front of the building which is the result of a performance given by a Kunsthochschule Weissensee affiliated artist, Elena Kaludova. Elena wore a t-shirt with the slogan “STOP BORING ART!” printed on the back so that it could be read as she drilled holes through the wooden sign. The sign had the words “BORING ART” carved out of it. The artist drilled through most of the letters until only the “O” and “R” were left intact.

construction Kuhlhaus facade

 

 

drive thru gate scriptfloating whale

Boring Art plant elementals old technology landscape2 old technology landscape cassette deck with joystickstrips montage light and dark grass drawing musical drawing musical drawing closeup bird lady full bird lady embroidery embroidery closeup colored glass projection

 

 

Gallery Stop 3: Schwarz Contemporary run by Ann Schwarz

Exhibit: works by several artists represented by the gallery

Schwarz Contemporary

 

Monika Goetz_2200 K

Postcard of artwork, 2200 K by Monika Goetz

cyanotype

photograph of paper by Holger Neihaus

pink paper

painting by Fee Kleiss (left) and photo of paper by Holger Neihaus (right)

 

spray paint on nylon

paint on white kite fabric by Henrik Eiben

 

 

Gallery Stop 4: Wentrup Galerie by Jan Wentrup

Exhibit:  The gallery currently represents 13 artists. Works by several of those artists were on display.

Wentrup

Main gallery - Axel Geis's photo realistic chandeliers painted from different angles on highly glossed canvases. The viewer stands in the middle where the light fixture would normally be so that the experience of the installation refers to itself.

Main gallery – Axel Geis’s photo realistic chandeliers painted from different angles on highly glossed canvases. The viewer stands in the middle where the light fixture would normally be so that the experience of the installation refers to itself.

Gregor Hildebrandt creates many of his artworks from cassette tapes. In some cases, as with this piece, he glues the tape to a canvas and before peeling the audio tape back off again, he applies pressure through footsteps, scratching, etc, so that the emulsion stays on the canvas where he has effected it. Those works are names after the music that was recorded on that tape, which he was most likely listening to while making his marks on them. This one is titled “Neues vom Trickser (Toco) IV” by the band Tocotronic.

Gregor Hildebrandt creates many of his artworks from cassette tapes. In some cases, as with this piece, he glues the tape to a canvas and before peeling the audio tape back off again, he applies pressure through footsteps, scratching, etc, so that the emulsion stays on the canvas where he has effected it. Those works are named after the music that was recorded on that tape, which he was most likely listening to while making his marks on them. This one is titled “Neues vom Trickser (Toco) IV” by the band Tocotronic.

Gregor Hildebrandt creates many of his artworks from cassette tapes. In this case, he cut still frames from movies into small rectangles that will fit inside of cassette case spines. The image here is from “Eyes Wide Shut”.

Gregor Hildebrandt creates many of his artworks from cassette tapes. As in this case, he cuts still frames from movies into small rectangles that will fit inside of cassette case spines then displays them in cassette wall organizers. The image here is from “Eyes Wide Shut”.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. A photograph of marble is used as paper mâché landscape on another cement sheet.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. The artists are then creating copies of copies to a microscopic level. Here, a photograph of marble is used as a paper mâché landscape onto a cement sheet.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. A photograph of marble is used as paper mâché landscape on another cement sheet.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. The artists are then creating copies of copies to a microscopic level. Here, a photograph of marble is used as a paper mâché landscape onto a cement sheet.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. After using photographic images as wallpaper on cement sheets, layers appear to be torn away to reveal another texture and shade underneath.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. The artists are then creating copies of copies to a microscopic level. Here, after using photographic images as wallpaper on cement sheets, layers appear to be torn away to reveal another texture and shade underneath.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. After using photographic images as wallpaper on cement sheets, layers appear to be torn away to reveal another texture and shade underneath.

Peles Empire are two female artists, Katharina Stöver from Germany and Barbara Wolff from Romania who both currently work in London. The goal of their collaborative team is to copy the rooms of the Peles Castle in Romania and present it in the new ways. The castle already consists of copied, mismatched styles from Baroque to Art Deco. The artists are then creating copies of copies to a microscopic level. Here, after using photographic images as wallpaper on cement sheets, layers appear to be torn away to reveal another texture and shade underneath.

Cristian Andersen bronze sculpture

Cristian Andersen bronze sculpture

 

Studio Tour

HB 55 (Herzbergstrasse 55) Räume der kunst (rooms of art). This historical set of buildings used to be a margarine factory.

HB55 Räume der Kunst1909margarine factoryKunstfabrik studios

1) Aleks Slota (no images): It was explained to me that Aleks uses a megaphone to recite speeches, that were written but never read, out of his studio window. One example was the speech written in case the U.S. astronauts never returned from their first trip to the moon.

2) Art photographer, who makes commentary on the fashion world and beauty, Ivonne Thein http://www.ivonnethein.com/

wisps

from Ivonne Thein’s Thirty-two Kilos series

toothache

from Ivonne Thein’s Thirty-two Kilos series

facelessplastic and human

video of a woman dressing into and undressing from a second skin

video of a woman dressing into and undressing from a second skin

A hidden camera behind the black box on the wall projects a light portrait of the person standing in front of it, rendering them indistinguishable.

A hidden camera behind the black box on the wall displays a live action, out of focus,  light portrait of the person standing in front of it, thus rendering them indistinguishably.

postcard from Ivonne Thein’s Proforma series which appears to be human bodies seamlessly joined with mannequin heads or possibly just their faces. This is the most subtle and effective commentary on airbrushing / Photoshopping models that I’ve seen to date.

3) Louise Gibson is a sculptress from Scotland currently working in Berlin at a studio near a scrapyard. She embeds discarded clothing and electronics in resin castings. In addition, she melts, morphs, and varnishes large appliances and building materials into blobs of color and sheen. http://www.louisegibson.co.uk/?work-cat=current

trio jeansfaux furgreen fabric plaidpurplesfilled boots melted appliances  fuse boxesresin windowThe Clawsunflowers zink und kabel  stoves fencescrapyard and students colorful scraps

 

 

 


Spaces Between – An art show by Teruko Nimura

Teruko Nimura opened her solo show, ‘Spaces Between’, at Testsite this Sunday. Not only was the show lovely and fun, but the gallery space is gorgeous.

These images are teasers to encourage you to visit the exhibit in person. Not all the works are included here, so you have to go there to see them.

http://www.fluentcollab.org/testsite/index.php/projects/index/27