a blog about poetic creativity*******************ALL IMAGES © Stephanie Reid for HaikuFlash

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Gorman Falls and Colorado Bend State Park, Texas

Raccoons raid campsites

Barking echoes in canyons

Boars grumble in the night

 

Creatures in the Moon

Stills from a handmade book, Creatures in the Moon, that I made in collaboration with Todd Rychener to be sent to Telavi State University (Republic of Georgia) as a gift for their library. Book artist / educator, Miriam Schaer, will be delivering the books in person during her Fulbright awarded trip to teach and research felt and embroidery in art book making. Todd and I illustrated our book with colored pencils, gel pens, paint pigment, and gouache. The story is the third in a series of book films I am currently working on.

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Winter Shadows

In between larger, complex projects, I do simple ones like this little series of photos, Winter Shadows (a follow up to my Autumn Shadows series from 2015) in collaboration with another Austin artist, Todd Rychener, for the Weather show at Lower Level Creative Space in Denver with colleagues Lindey Anderson from Colorado (Gallery Director), Asher Mains from Grenada, and Andy Spaziani from Canada.

empty seed pods

dead leaves

bare twigs

empty seed pods

winter color

winter-shadows

 

 

 

 

Dissolve – A collection of photography on the theme Imperceptible Self

This summer, in Berlin, the Transart Institute is hosting an art festival, the Transart Triennale, with artists from far way presenting works that speak to the theme Imperceptible Self, a term coined by philosopher Rosi Braidotti. For the TI Triennale Media Tent, I have curated a blog post, entitled Dissolve, featuring three photographers’ works which I feel poetically embody this theme. (*Not for viewing by children*). To visit this work on the TI Triennale site, view it here: http://www.transarttriennale.org/blog/dissolve

 

In a world full of chaos we must search inside ourselves for orientation. Our motivations towards material success, desires, and status melt away as we access the internal realms. Once ego has dissolved, we tap into the flow of potentialities where we find beautiful and bizarre revelations beckoning us to give birth to them as art, stories, and sound. Those who can translate the meaning of what they have discovered inside their psyches, give us a better understanding of their imperceptible selves. Their identities become more closely aligned with their purpose as embodiments of an eternal life-force. In this exhibition, three photographers have done just that. By tuning into what is beyond the visible, they have brought psychological and emotional impact back into the physical realm using symbolic gestures, props, and movement. Stephanie Reid – curator.

 

Raphael Umscheid

Ghosts

Approaches to art that are perpetually bright and sunny lack dimension as they ignore the darker aspects of life. The Surrealist André Breton coined the term “l’humour noir”, also known as black comedy or gallows humor, which takes a cynical approach to sensitive topics. It often makes light of them, sometimes in offensive ways, in order to prompt serious contemplation. L’humour noir writing usually concludes that life is meaningless, yet absurdly comical.

Similarly, in Umscheid’s “Ghosts” we might coin the term gray comedy. Here he represents the mental blind spots where our motivations are still secreted away from consciousness. This is the stage where we function as shades of ourselves. Yet the apparitions he depicts are sympathetic characters. Some are caught between oblivion and manifestation / ego and spirit, not quite ready to surrender to the mystery of becoming-imperceptible. Like small children trying to find their way, he keenly describes their awkwardness. Their grasping at the invisible strings of the world as if it were a puppet is futile. Their imbalance and uncertainty causes them to collide into delicately gorgeous and vaguely humorous consequences. Even the “Made in Korea” marking sewn onto the borders of the fabric are part of the haphazard nature of these ghosts’ encounters. In Falter, a ghost drags its paint covered foot as if it had accidentally stumbled into it and is now attempting to wipe it off. In Fallen Petals, the apparition props up a dead flower on its hip as a final protest to fading away. The two almost seem to empathize with each other. In Pool’s Bottom, the phantom gives a shudder and impulsively fights to maintain muscular control in the final throes of losing corporeality.

Others in his series appear as if they have finally succumbed to their dissolution. In Becoming the Other, individual personalities are lost as they merge to become new forms. In To the Heavens, lets its limp limbs float with the stars. Finally, in Uncloaking, it appears as if one is already levitating, and about to be unveiled after an incubation period. It has touched the invisible and is now prepared to function with a new mind state perpetually open to flux.

Painted Leg

Falter

Floating with the Stars

To the Heavens

Fading Petals

Fallen Petals

Uncloaking

Uncloaking

Shudder

Pool’s Bottom

Becoming Other

Becoming the Other

 

(Models: Dandie Doyle, Kate Kubala, Heather Sanford, Mechelle Gonzales, Rachel Theobald, and Jordan Schiappa)

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George Angelovski

Post Morality

How can men learn from the feminine Jungian archetype, the anima, theorized to be inside them all? She is said to visit their dreams to guide them towards enhancing intangible abilities such as intuition, receptivity to the irrational, and depth of emotion, all of which will balance their lives. In his Post Morality series, Angelovski has done just that by listening to his inner visions and dreams about how to proceed with a portrait session requested by the pregnant model.

Despite the collection seeming to be influenced by Joel Peter Witkin, after getting to know the model better, Jan Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring suddenly came to the photographer’s mind. That famous painting is sometimes considered a tronie, a 16thand 17thcentury term for Dutch and Flemish paintings of heads of universal character types, usually wearing costumes, and portrayed to show distinct expressions descriptive of those characters. A youth might be making a funny face or a witch might appear to be laughing hysterically. Sometimes the faces were obstructed by shadows to create a more dramatic image.

A subsequent dream of the model wearing one of artist Polly van der Glas’s “facebags” became the catalyst for the costume in these photos. Similarly to the ploy of shadows in tronies, the woman’s face is totally covered here leaving the expression to be found on the mask itself, which might be indicative of what she is representing or feeling such as in the warrior-like characterization on the mask in organ of corti, where she is standing confidently. If one can overlook the alarming, almost grotesque images, the fact that the figure wears masks with no way to look outwards, reveals to us that she embodies the skill of looking inward in contemplation. Perhaps even better able to communicate with the child in her womb. Angelovski then, has shown in these images a potent connection between spirit and flesh, not only of one’s self, but with others. What better archetype to embody this ideal than a mother, a woman who is willing to sacrifice so much in life and become so vulnerable for her child-to-be?

Finally, it is very fitting that while trying to find a third person for this exhibition, I had a daydream vision of George’s face in a dark stairwell with a spiral staircase. A few days later, I saw this Post Morality series and it dawned on me that it was the missing link between the other two artist’s works here.

with god under me

pilli

organ of corti

virgins milk figure 2

socrates bar

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Analia Sirabonian

(in collaboration with her brother, Andrés

Where is the beginning and ending of our flesh? When we empathize with another? When we are outsiders who do not function by the status quo? When we build our lives around genuine passion and devotion to our work? When we commune with our environment?

Here, Analia explores these questions by seeking the answers in the story of the unusual life circumstances of herself and her brother, Andrés. Although they have the same parents, he was first born with a natural genetic alteration causing physical disfigurements and a mental disorder, whereas she was born after genetic adjustments were made to ensure she was healthy. In opposite ways, how they were brought into the world is very different from the majority of humans. Together they are outside of societal norms. Their portrait below shows Ani tenderly expressing her attempt to empathize with and protect him, hiding his protruding rib cage and face, while at the same time gently placing her hand on his.

In her second piece the gyroscopic panorama of the kitchen in a restaurant where Andrés is a potato peeler, he again only shows his lovely, dedicated hands to us.

The final photograph, from her series of misshapen potatoes, represents the ones he discards at work, almost tragically revealing his self-image by imitating of the majority of society who compulsively reject that which is not uniform.

Autorretrato II (Self-Portrait)

**Below is a still image from a 360 degree interactive gyroscopic image, entitled José, after the owner of the restaurant where Andrés works.

To view it, click here, then scroll left, right, up and down, for the full view: http://analiasirabonian.esy.es/jose/

Jose detail

Misshapen potatoes (1 of a series of 3)

 

UK coasts

winds build to a gale

foam caresses stone shorelines

birds hover like kites

Why I rarely socialize December-March

seikô udoku; kakô tôdoku (In summer, cultivate the fields; in winter, cultivate the mind.)

smell, taste, and hear snow

winter’s blood, water’s sleep dance

fragility’s breath

temperature drop

Warm windy sidewalk

Winter suddenly burst through

As I crossed the street

 

Green parrots sitting

Two by two four love birds kiss

Beak to beak on wire

naughty green fairy

hid the way back home from me

how sweet to be lost