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Supper, Lower East Side, NYC

My favorite Italian restaurant in New York. An intimate supper with classmates from Transart Institute MFA program.

Supper has a nice selection of wine by the glass or bottle. They offer fresh bread and garlicky Tuscany beans as a starter. I love their hearty risotto on a cold night. Others enjoyed entrées such as

delectably smooth mozzarella topped pasta and beet salad. To seal the deal, we shared a piece of tiramisu, which was not too sweet and super creamy.

Reservations required for large parties, Cash only

http://supperrestaurant.com/

 

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid

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New York City, Chelsea District, January 2015

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid

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To view the area from a different angle, take a walk on the Chelsea High Line, an elevated railroad track that has been converted into a boardwalk and garden.

If you’re a foodie, be sure to check out the Chelsea Market which holds a wide array of gourmet restaurants, a fresh spice vendor, books, and sometimes an arts and crafts bazaar inside a beautifully restored National Biscuit Company factory. This is also where The Food Network has its offices.

 

Also recommended is the cozy Co Pane pizza serving 17 unique, wood-fired combos.

http://www.co-pane.com/index.php

Fashionistas! Check out the Comme des Garçons shop. It’s like being in a toyshop elf’s closet. Besides pointy shoes, apparel becomes outrageously fun wearable sculpture in here.

CAM01625

 

Chelsea Gallery Tour Favs:

Murray Guy Gallery, Lucy Skaer’s exhibit Sticks and Stones takes two forms cut from a dissected mahogany tree and duplicates each in a variety of materials. This successful interpretation of belonging to a group with similarities while retaining individuality gives new, exciting meaning to sculpture.

Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, Peggy Preheim’s exhibit Archipelago combines nostalgic pencil drawings of people in found photos with pressed leaves or other natural materials such as feathers and fur. The delicate illustrations ask us to imagine stories of interaction between gentle humans and nature.

 

Gagosian Gallery, Takashi Murakami’s exhibit In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow is exhilarating in its scale and use of cutting edge materials. Taking queue, as Murakami does, from graphic design precious metals sheets are embossed with skulls then over painted with acrylic landscapes and characters straight from a comic book and screened designs of acidic suns. Thick glossy lacquers embedded with glitter enhance the dimensional quality of the works where mandalas of Buddhist masters beckon neophytes to walk the thin line between the land of living and dead, their insane gestures and eyes give warning of what we will experience there. Gigantic guardian sculptures guard the gates of Nirvana and fight those who try to enter before they are well prepared. The gorgeous scent of ancient wood permeates the front gallery which is entered through a replica of a shinto shrine.

 

303 Gallery, Mike Nelson’s exhibit Gang of Seven takes found objects collected on his tour of the west coast of the United States and Canada and turns them into imaginative and sometimes disturbing sculpture.

New York City, MoMA, January 10, 2015

During the winter residency for my grad school MFA program, I had the pleasure of visiting several places that I love in New York. In this post, I will share some of the highlights of my first stop, the Museum of Modern Art.

MoMa Courtyard in the Snow

*Henri Matisse Cutouts show. Excellent curation. For those of you are less familiar with art history, the painter Matisse became disabled as he aged and was confined to a wheelchair. This was when he produced a new phase of works from collaged paper cutouts. With the help of his lovely assistants, he was able to create monumental murals and even chapel stained glass designs.

Enter the exhibit:  A room of playful works commissioned by Verve Magazine. The circus themes and flowing shapes of the Icarus myth are prevalent. A quote from the artist elucidates his experience making those cutouts, “You have no idea how, during the cutout paper period, the sensation of flight which emanated forms helped me better to adjust my hand when it used scissors…It’s a kind of linear and graphic equivalence to the sensation of flight.”

Next: A room meant to mimic his studio with mockups, paper samples, and photos of him, scissors in hand surrounded by scraps of paper which had fallen to the ground – negative spaces of shapes he had cut. Two long walls hold examples of his “Oceania” series which were printed into wallpaper – sandy beige backgrounds with all white cutouts of seagulls, flora and fauna of the waters.

A darker room: Watch a film of Matisse working with an assistant to design vestments (cloaks) for the Chapelle du Rosaire de Vence. Stained glass sections are lit from behind. *In the gift shop I purchased holiday cards with tinted acetate covers to look like one the chapel windows maquettes, La Nuit de Noël (Christmas Night).

The monumental works: The highlights in the last few rooms are works inspired by Islamic art such as Large Decoration with Masks which is approximately 11′ x 32′. You will also see the joyful, immersive work The Parakeet and the Mermaid, which is approximately 11’ x 25’ and meant to give the sensation of being in a garden. It was completed towards the end of his life when he was no longer to enjoy his own garden as he once had.

Souvenir: Amongst prints and lengthy books about the artist’s life and career, I found a gem produced by MoMa who commissioned a cutout artist to create illustrations about Matisse and his inspiration from nature and his garden. By printing it on matte surface paper, the book better represents his cutouts, especially in the bonus gatefold pages of his works.

http://www.momastore.org/museum/moma/ProductDisplay_Matisses-Garden-Childrens-Book_10451_10001_192106_-1_26683_11486

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*In the contemporary art gallery, adjacent the Matisse Cutouts, I discovered a contemporary artist whose work I would like to share here. Her name is Kerstin Brätsch. These works are large scale oil on paper:

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*A choice selection from the permanent collection of modern masters was on display. They are hard to capture in photos, especially when they are behind glass and A Starry Night and The Persistence of Memory are now. Sadly, some of the life has been sucked out of them by this addition, which was not there the last time I saw those pieces on tour. I was not in awe of the vortex pulling me in as I had been when Van Gogh’s masterpiece was on view in Houston. This is what happens when people insist on touching the art or using flash! Luckily the Guggenheim had some of his work out (sans glass) and I got a taste of that vibrance on this visit.  Less famous, but not less important than the above mentioned paintings, my favorite Matisse oil, Goldfish and Palette, was on view as a nice counterpart to the cutouts exhibit. Other pieces I adore by Léger, Brancusi (Mademoiselle Pogany sculpture below), Cornell, Picasso, and Klimt were present as well.

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*In the design section, Tomáš Gabzdil Libertinya presented a vessel slowly made by bees using a “vase-shaped scaffold” for a beehive which was removed to reveal the waxen vase seen here:

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*Another special exhibit was a retrospective, entitled The Heart is Not a Metaphor, of the sculptor Robert Gober‘s work. Seemingly irreverent with its wallpaper of penis and vagina line art, other rooms papered like a fall forest scene with objects protruding out of wax torsos and crotches coming out from the bottoms of walls , and the like, his work has a serious tone which requires us to think of domesticity, sexuality, and religion more closely. Within the vast, sparse rooms, I felt less claustrophobic than I normally do when thinking of a permanent home. Sexuality felt like an ordinary and mundane activity that might take a turn for the bizarre if one becomes too familiar with it. A sinister underbelly is exposed inside of a fireplace full of girls disembodies legs, pink Mary Jane shoes and bobby socks intact. A nearby installation of a large vintage suitcase had its bottom cutout to accommodate a sewage grate installed into the gallery floor where below a softly lit scene of rocks and water plants swayed in flowing water and bubbles. This somehow lessened the blow of the previous difficult subject matter by offering an escape for the mind before exiting the show. The denouement of his story played out gently with an easy chair covered in custom designed fabric of pink, yellow, and blue florals and birds and other digestible fare.

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*Soul of the Underground, an exhibit featuring works by Jean DuBuffet, contained prints, paintings, and sculptures made from dirt, sticks, aluminum foil, grass, and other common materials used in unexpected ways to evoke gritty, playful, and sometimes shamanistic imagery as antithesis of la bourgeoisie. In the third image below, Landscape with Bulldog, random objects were inked, pressed, and then reassembled to create the final composition.

Le Magicien


Landscape with Bulldog …………………………………..

*Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection 1909-1949 reminded me of the fun and experimentation I had when I started taking black and white photos in the 80’s. The surprise revealed on paper in the darkroom is unparalleled by digital photography and I look forward to working in one again someday. At the height of film photography we can see here that playing with light, shadow, form, and perspective are emphasized when color is taken out of the equation. The luxurious platinum, palladium, and silver surfaces reminded me of a treasure box. This is truly an art form that has been lost, but many young people are recognizing this and word has it that shuttered analog photo departments are being revived around the country. This news has helped relieve some of my melancholy around the matter. For a virtual tour, visit the MoMa page below:

http://www.moma.org/interactives/objectphoto/#gallery?dateBegin=1900&dateEnd=1950&objectsSelected=84072

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*Finally, I would like to give mention to the Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye section which showcased vintage stereo equipment, posters, and album art. Especially inspiring to me is this print by Koichi Sato for New Music Media and this stereo with swinging, detachable speakers by artist Mario Bellini and Manufactured by Brionvega S.p.A., Italy.

Koichi Sato New Music Media

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*To see what is on showing at MoMa for during your next visit to Manhattan, check their calendar:

http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/

Festival of Texas Fiddling

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid

Twin Sisters Dance Hall, Blanco, Texas
December 6th, 2014

Various styles of Texas fiddling graced the room that night:

Los Triñeros, a Mexican-American son Huasteco style that originated in NE Mexico and is a blend of native and Spanish music.
Son Huasteco is usually played by a trio on a small instrument similar to a mandolin, called a jarana; a lower clef instrument called guitarra huapanguera;
and a violin. The highlights usually include the violinist playing with bravado and the vocalist singing in a falsetto, which to me sounds like a voice impersonating the high notes of the violin.

https://vimeo.com/114588521

Los Triñeros

Sean Orr, Country-style fiddler recognizable influenced by Celtic music

Mia Orosco, who I didn’t get to hear, but is an award winning contest fiddler who can be seen elsewhere on the Internet. I would describe her playing as crisp and clean.

Howard Rains, who was apparently playing old style and is involved with a group who has taken the time to learn O. Henry, parlor style songs.

Ed Poullard from Beaumont playing a Cajun style. The song in the video here (https://vimeo.com/114585849) reminds me of unrequited love, very French indeed.

Bryan Marshall, played polish flavored tunes, that I missed during the festival but was able to hear around the fire pit later that night.

To end the night, Al Dressen’s Super Swing Revue played a nice long set for the dancers to practice their waltz, two-step, reel, and of course, swing moves.

(https://vimeo.com/114600381)

AFTER PARTY!

Fire pit jam videos: Bryan Marshall, Ed Poullard, and Mark Rubin on fiddle in videos one and two below, Frank Motley on accordion and Jakub Marshall on clarinet in video three.

1) https://vimeo.com/114741894

2) https://vimeo.com/114742897

3) https://vimeo.com/114607236

TEXAS FIDDLE SAMPLE CD

One of the main sponsors of the event was Texas Folklife has compiled a sampler CD of fiddling called, Traditional Music of Texas, Volume 1: Fiddle Recordings from the Texas Folklife Archives, that can be ordered on their web page https://squareup.com/market/texas-folklife I picked one up and have been addicted to it! Nothin’ like a cheery fiddle tune for the holidays.

**Two new terms fiddling terms I heard on that CD are ‘breakdown’ and ‘double stop’. The definition of ‘breakdown’ seems to vary depending on where the players are from. In the north, from what I gather, it refers to a fast paced 2/4 or 4/4 song that allows for a lot of footwork, but in southern climates, it tends to be a bit slower so that dancers don’t overheat. ‘Double stop’ means to play two notes at the same time, which is apparently difficult to do. To ‘stop’ a string is to press it down, but on a ‘double stop’ this is not necessarily the case. In addition, one string can be plucked and the other bowed to play the ‘double stop’.**

Autumn

All images and text copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid

 

Those of you who have been following my blog for a while might remember that I have posted about cicadas as heralds of summer.

Here are new haiku written during a recent walk at the Colleyville Nature Preserve in North Texas.

 

Cool breeze and dirt path

Cicada belly up…still…

Summer is over

 

A dozen monarchs

Fuel up for their journey

South to Mexico

Monarchs-4   Monarchs-9   Monarchs-11   Monarchs-10     Monarchs   Monarchs-16   Monarchs-13  Monarchs-17

Berlin Urban Art and Architecture

Single click thumbnails to enlarge and view as slideshow. All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid

Transart Institute Course Sampler – World as Sculpture, Wild Urbanity, and Double Lens

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid

The three week residency was incredibly rewarding, fast paced, and challenging. Courses took place at Uferstudios in Berlin. They typically ran from 9AM-6 PM, then students and staff reconvened at 7:00 for an hour and half presentation session. For these, the student body split into two rooms where three students gave a 15 minute overview of their work and goals for their MFA studies, followed by a ten minute Q&A Session. In addition, each Friday morning, practicing professional artists from around the world would give a 7 minute presentation of their work (Pecha Kucha). Afterwards, groups of eight students would go with one of the artist’s to present their work and get feedback. On the weekends, studio tours and vernissages of student (MFA and PhD) exhibits in Berlin galleries took place. To learn more about those events, see my other posts. The course descriptions below are only a small sample of the options students have for the residency.

studio courtyard

Uferstudios courtyard facing NW. The complex used to be a rail yard for horse drawn carriage rail, then eventually a depot for electric street cars and cable cars. At that time new buildings for the transport station. The architect, Jean Krämer, designed them using using a combination of expressionist and Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity, or without ornamentation) styles.

studio courtyard2

Uferstudios courtyard facing SE. The complex used to be a rail yard for horse drawn carriage rail, then eventually a depot for electric street cars and cable cars. At that time new buildings for the transport station. The architect, Jean Krämer, designed them using using a combination of expressionist and Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity, or without ornamentation) styles.

Michael Bowdidge’s, The World as Sculpture, course for MFA and Certificate students

Inspired by the book The World as Sculpture: The Changing Status of Sculpture from the Renaissance to the Present Day by James Hall, Mr. Bowdidge exposed our  interdisciplary class of artists to methods of making our work more sculptural. The course was exciting and felt very productive. By default, we received a thorough survey of the history of sculpture. Not only did the professor bring examples for each discussion, but asked us to also bring images and physical work to enhance the conversation. The following examples of some of the reading assignments and activities we did in the four day course.

 DAY ONE:

1) Discuss reading assignment : Sculpture and the sculptural by Erik Koed

2) Work with a partner to combine two objects together in as many ways possible. Photograph the different iterations. Several minutes into the exercise, classmate and dancer, Jeca Rodriguez suggested giving a theme to the juxtapositions such as to make one the oppressor and the other the oppressed. My partner Claire Elizabeth Barratt, also a dancer, and I came up with over 20 ways to combine her hand with my umbrella.

3) Bring an example of artwork that is not sculpture but has something sculptural about it. I brought the links to Gabriel Dawe’s string installations:

Gabriel Dawe's plexus no. 5

Gabriel Dawe’s plexus no. 5

Gabriel Dawe's plexus no. 8

Gabriel Dawe’s plexus no. 8

Gabriel Dawe's relic from plexus no. 4

Gabriel Dawe’s relic from plexus no. 4

4) Select an artwork from the previous class discussion and make it more or less sculptural.

Classmate Nethery Wylie shared Laleh Mehran’s installation Entropic Order http://www.lalehmehran.com/Entropic-Order, in which a programmed machine moves around a track on the ceiling, all the while, dragging a pendulum with it to draw traditional Islamic patterns in black “sand” on the floor. A motion detector senses people entering the room and moving about, which disrupts the action of the pendulum so that the perfection of its efforts is thwarted. Straight lines become wavy, shaky, and distorted. Therefore, this artwork functions as a way to comment on the futility of attempting to enforce a dogma, religious or not, because once human interaction comes into play, the static nature of “rules” is replaced by dynamic forces. It also reflects the instability of the Middle East.

I imagined adding spices commonly used in Persian cooking – paprika, cinnamon, and cumin to “draw” outlines to the negative space in the designs. Then using a piece of paper covered with double sided sticky graphics film to do a “rubbing”. What would hopefully remain on the adhesive tape would be an impression of the design from its sand and spices. The red and brown hues represent spilled blood of those who suffered within a turbulent and violent landscape. By transferring the image onto the graphics tape, the new image can also represent those who have migrated to flee the regime. They are only able to take a fraction of their culture with them. These steps are not meant to enhance her installation, as it needs none, but a way to help me achieve the goal of the exercise by playing with processes and materials. I have made a primarily subtractive process into a more sculptural work by  using an additive (spices), subtractive (taking away with the tape), and replication (a copy of the original design). It was not unlike forming a sand mandala, and the same ideas of displacement and lost culture expressed in my response to her could be said for other cultures who make sand drawings, the Tibetans and Native Americans.

photo taken during the process of filling in the gaps of Mehran’s design with paprika

paprika and black “sand”

transfer of paprika and black “sand” to another surface

DAY TWO: Additive processes. Discussions of Modeling vs. Assembling.

1) Bring a sculptural artwork you have made and feel is not quite complete, then discuss how to make it more sculptural. I created this illustration created for a world music compilation I also selected the songs for. I infer three-dimensionality by layering origami fold lines for a pine tree on top of the world map image. In response to the exercise, I stated that to make it more sculptural, I would fold (model) the illustration into its intended shape. The pine tree can then be set upon the set list to transform from packaging design to sculptural artwork.

CD close The Earth and a Pine Tree 150dpi OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2) Assemblage is a term used by curator William Seitz for a MOMA show in 1961, called “That Art of Assemblage”, featured works by Duchamp, Schwitters, Cornell and others who combined things like trinkets, household objects, newspaper clippings, and train tickets to create compositions, combined with or without traditional mediums like paint. Seitz felt the term was more descriptive than “collage” for that particular body of work.

Reading assignment: Assemblage by George Marcus and Erkan Saka.                                                                                                              Summary: Assemblage as a way to talk about chaos of modern world despite the daily structure which most of us live by. There are many possible ways to approach investigation into realms beyond clearly defined boundries. Discourse on temporary societies, a self-reflective description of an object, or a stage in a process are all examples of how assemblage can be used to explain intangible concepts. The ability to materialize such abstract ideas has had an influence on areas outside of art such as anthropological research. Marcus and Saka credit the success of the integration of post-structuralist ideas into social sciences to analytically detailed writings by theorists Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. This essay goes on to quote several social scientists who discuss how their work has been influenced by the theories of Deleuze and Guattari.

Finally, the writing expresses urgency that assemblage be handled carefully as to not become too structural or it runs the risk of losing it’s ephemeral quality. It is noted that during our current phase of globalization and rapid technological advancements, which are creating new behaviors in society, assemblage has a great deal of material to refer to and in a unique way from its original use in the early to mid 20th century.

3) Create a “Guattari and Deleuze assemblage”, meaning one which illustrates a step in a process. This is the train of thought that many conceptual artists use to develop their works.  I thought about the process of coffee. The goal of coffee drinkers is to be more awake and sharp thinking. Therefore, I coffee stained a square piece of paper and origami folded it into a crystal (diamond). Further discussion was spurred regarding the fortune made by coffee moguls who do not practice fair trade and how the crystal (diamond) is not “clear”. It is brown, or “muddy” representing the possible side effects of drinking coffee vs. other types of beverages such as matcha tea, or physical practices which render us more alert such as yoga, improving our diets, or simply getting more sleep.

4) In the vein of Allan Kaprow’s 1967 installation “Yard”, which was a room of tires for people to interact with by jumping through, sitting on, standing on, or even throwing them, the class did a performative installation. First we each passed a piece of paper around that we had written one word that reminded us of the Transart summer residency, and then passed it to the person next to us until everyone had written their word on our paper. We chanted the following list in rounds during the performance: succinct, iconoclast, join, concepts, humid, tsunami, pleasure, becoming, awake, microcosm, fluid, flux, coffee, turnip, tinted, sprudel. To view the performance, visit: https://vimeo.com/106896282

DAY THREE: Subtractive processes. Carving, deleting (what this means in the digital vs. analog world), erasing

1) Inspired by Rauschenberg’s “Erased de Kooning” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGRNQER16Do), bring an artwork you have made and are willing to allow a fellow student to practice a subtractive technique on. After receiving each artwork, we parted for about 45 mins. then reconvened for our destructive surprise.

I built a diorama landscape study and my partner was the dancer, Jeca Rodriguez, who is originally from Puerto Rico. She turned my diorama into a performance! She was really nervous to do her idea, but I assured her whatever she wanted to do was okay. She took the assemblage outside and mangled it something fierce to make it look like her home after a hurricane. Then she had everyone take turns, like the community on her island, to try to repair a little bit at a time. It was really touching and even brought a tear to my eye.

 

diorama study

Photos below taken by Michael Bowdidge.

destruction Jaye Gabriela2 Clare Ana gabe recovery

I was given a silk scarf by artist, Dana Zurzolo, who silkscreens guns into clothing as a way to prompt conversations about guns in America. I cutout machine gun spray shapes resembling those found in comic books, drew hearts, blood, and tears in glitter pens, then also cutout bullet holes in the heart. Because this clothing was meant to appeal to a woman, just as hot chicks with guns are supposed to make women feel empowered, I changed the text about a school shooting that was printed on the scarf to read as if the atrocity was made by a woman. The text was also changed to draw attention to the language of guns and their reference to female body parts.

subractive and additive

2) Inspired by John Cage’s 4”33, bring ‘nothing’ to class, but in a meaningful way that can be justified with regard to size / quantity / duration

DAY FOUR: Replicative processes. Copying, casting, copying, sampling

1) Replicate something in the nearby surroundings.

Bullet Wounds and Fissures

a pitted, fissured, and chipped brick wall

The crumbling wall

pencil rubbing, razor cut, and punctured paper

2) Replicate another artists work without directly copying it. Taking a que from Lawrence Yuxweluptun’s painting below, I sketched a still from a scene in my short film where a woman is dancing in Azteca clothing in front of a graffiti wall, except I drew the graffiti on her body.

Walking in the Spirit World

Walking in the Spirit World by Lawrence Yuxweluptun

Laura

graffiti skin

unfinished sketch

3) Reading: The Precession of Simulacra by Baudrillard, which gave the four phases of abstracting an original object as the reflection of a basic reality, the masking and/or perversion of a reality, the masking of the absence of a basic reality, and the absence of any relation to reality.

4) Work from an image/sound/clip/movement and find ways to replicate it which allow you to traverse or reference the four phases. My idea will not translate well here…

Caroline Koebel’s, Wild Urbanity, course for MFA and Certificate students

Inspired by her sighting of wild foxes in Berlin, Ms. Koebel designed a course around combing art with nature in the city.

1) discussion of Joseph Bueys hare and wolf performances

2) viewing of the film “A Rabbit in Berlin”

3) readings from Darwin, da Vinci, and the thoroughly enjoyable The Forest Unseen: A Year’s Watch in Nature by David George Haskell

4) a tour of the archives of the Naturkundmuseum. Sad and fascinating highlights included: seeing Charles Darwin’s signature in one of his journals; blown glass sculptures of medusozoa and other small flowery looking sea creatures; rooms of skulls, skeletons, horns, and taxidermy; cases of nests and birds; lockers of skins; cardboard boxes of taxidermied animals, some with holes cut in the side so that stiff legs of a fast running feline can poke through; plastic bags of bats; weight lifting a fossilized dinosaur bone that must have been about 20 lbs although only 1.5 ft; a 4 ft long narwhal tooth; glass room of fish, snakes, and foxes preserved in alcohol.

tubes of dead snakes

Images from the archive cannot be made public, but I took these photos in the public area.

5) lectures by scientists who study the wild boar and fox population in Berlin. FUN FACT! Some of the boars have been seen waiting at the traffic lights, for cars to stop, before crossing the street.

wild boars 150

I found this postcard by Tatiana Witte in a shop the day before I left Berlin.

6) an excursion in the city to create work in response to nature found there

crows on train rail crows staring at pizza

Hooded Crows eat Pizza on the Tram tracks

grey and black Hooded Crows eat Pizza on the Tram tracks

stump study3 stump study5stump study8

stump study6

tiny green tree beetle tears

tiny green tree beetle tears

 

Anna Faroqhi’s, Double Lens, film essay workshop for MFA and Certificate students

1) screening and discussion of several historial film essays: “Ghosts for Breakfast” by Hanz Richter; “11 Variations on Rain” by Joris Ivens; “Night and Fog” by Alain Resnais; “Les Mains Négatives” by Marguerite Duras; and “Serious Games” by Harun Farocki, the instructor’s recently deceased father.

2) Each student was given a line from the German Expressionist poet, Jakob van Hoddis, to film a 30 second to three minute clip to be edited together. Some lines are missing from the film or slightly altered to suit the artists. My line was, “Into the tender green of the trees.” https://vimeo.com/106867894

In the Morning
A strong wind sprang upwards,
Opens the bloody gates of iron heaven,
Beats on the towers.
Brightly ringing loud and sinuous over the brazen plane of the city.
The sooty morning sun. Thundering trains on dams.
Golden angel-ploughs plow through the clouds.
Strong wind over the pale city.
Steamboats and cranes awaken by the dirty, flowing stream.
The bells of the weathered cathedral beat sullenly.
You see many women and girls going to work.
In the pale light. Wild from the night. Their skirts flutter.
Limbs made for love.
Into the machine and tedious labor.
Look into the tender light.
Into the tender green of the trees.
Listen! The sparrow is crying out.
And outside, in the wild fields,
larks are singing.

Mila Kunst and Lindner Project – Transart Institute – MFA and PhD student works – Summer 2014

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid.

Selected works from Mila Kunst Intermezzo #1

photography by Gabriela Gusmao

photographic works by Gabriela Gusmão

beautiful wooden floor inlay at Mila Kunst Gallery

 

Sylvia Adamcik2

photographic work by Sylvia Adamcik

Sylvia Adamcik1

photographic work by Sylvia Adamcik

drawing by Julia Hyde inspired by La Forêt de Soignes (The Healing Forest) in Belgium

 

landscape painting by Christopher Huck

 

Selected works from Mila Kunst Intermezzo #3

sculpture by Lisa Osborn

sculpture by Lisa Osborn

Laurel Terlesky4

installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky. Several women poignantly discuss the loss of their mothers and the gradual process of being able to grasp the finality of their passing away.

Laurel Terlesky6

installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky. Several women poignantly discuss the loss of their mothers and the gradual process of being able to grasp the finality of their passing away.

Laurel Terlesky8

installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky. Several women poignantly discuss the loss of their mothers and the gradual process of being able to grasp the finality of their passing away.

Laurel Terlesky7

installation (sound, smoke, video, and vinyl cutout walkway walls) by Laurel Terlesky. Several women poignantly discuss the loss of their mothers and the gradual process of being able to grasp the finality of their passing away.

 

Selected works from

Lindner Project Space

July 27, 2014

Lindner Project courtyard

Lindner Project Courtyard

Jamie Hamilton install

Jamie Hamilton book installation documenting his learning how to tightrope walk in New Mexico

Mikkel Niemann1

film installation by Mikkel Niemann. This film diptych explores man’s competition with nature. On the left we see the artist fighting with his opponent. On the right, he sits in an outdoor installation and films periodically over a period of time so that the imposition he has created in the environment is eventually completely overcome by the elements which tear away at the homey looking wallpaper and wild animals who come and eat his apples.

Mikkel Niemann2

film installation by Mikkel Niemann. This film diptych explores man’s competition with nature. On the left we see the artist fighting with his opponent. On the right, he sits in an outdoor installation and films periodically over a period of time so that the imposition he has created in the environment is eventually completely overcome by the elements which tear away at the homey looking wallpaper and wild animals who come and eat his apples.

Mikkel Niemann3

film installation by Mikkel Niemann. This film diptych explores man’s competition with nature. On the left we see the artist fighting with his opponent. On the right, he sits in an outdoor installation and films periodically over a period of time so that the imposition he has created in the environment is eventually completely overcome by the elements which tear away at the homey looking wallpaper and wild animals who come and eat his apples.

Lindner basement

remnants from a performance installation by Rosina Ivanova. The artist practiced a feat of strength and endurance by holding up weights, with both arms outstretched to her sides, for a long period of time. Occasionally, she rings an encouraging bell. She likens the experience to the efforts of travel and immigration. All the while, a boat travels through the water on the screen behind her to emphasize the connection.

Rosinas wts

remnants from a performance installation by Rosina Ivanova. The artist practiced a feat of strength and endurance by holding up weights, with both arms outstretched to her sides, for a long period of time. Occasionally, she rings an encouraging bell. She likens the experience to the efforts of travel and immigration. All the while, a boat travels through the water on the screen behind her to emphasize the connection.

Selected works from Lindner Project Space

Alternative Maternals

August 9th, 2014

a beautiful dance performance with a rocking chair about motherhood by Jeca Rodriguez

amongst other objects, book artist and Columbia College professor, Miriam Schaer displayed throughout the gallery, baby clothes embroidered with stinging quotes such as, “Your child is the best art work you have ever made. You don’t need to make any other art,” and “Your not having children is the biggest disappointment of our life. These clothes were put on baby dolls and photographed for her book, “The Presence of Their Absence”. To see more of her work, visit: http://miriamschaer.com/

a haunting performance, “The Maternal Line” by Valerie Walkerdine which is about learning to speak with ghosts by allowing them to have a way to speak, even if they do not exist, their memory still exists within us. Her work posits how art can help us what is being transmitted to us. How can we feel with the other as the womb conveys sound? She often uses threes in her work, for example a performance will begin with 1) a lost spirit not at peace,  2) entering the underworld as a half-being, 3) release. Her opening to this performance was to slowly walk through the gallery towards the winding staircase leading to the basement, all the while singing solemn atavistic sounds similar to Lisa Gerrard. When she reaches the ground floor, a projection of close ups of dancers moving around on the ground is screened behind her. Suddenly, the image is flipped to look like they are crawling around on the ceiling. Valerie sings and shouts eerily as if in turmoil. A new scene forms and the focus is on a torso shot of a young woman in a red leotard being pushed back and forth between other dancers in black. They gradually work her into a frenzy until Valerie screams and pleads for it to STOP! STOP! The scene fades away into white with a blurred figure dancing there.  Now in a white leotard, Valerie dances in front of the screen, which creates strange juxtapositions between her brightly illuminated limbs and her silhouette. The mood lifts as she boisterously sings, a song about her Chiquita being sweeta, singing to her burro and how people will think her a fool.  She stated that she uses songs that are important to her mother and grandmother in her works, so maybe this playful song was one of their favorites.

photo collages created by Deborah Dudley  ~

Deborah Dudley

postcards from Brain Candy series by Deborah Dudley working in conjunction with her daughters

Hamburger Banhof Museum, Berlin – July 31, 2014

Hamburger Banhof facad

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid

We didn’t see the entire museum, but instead spent a good deal of time in the upstairs film installation room and the following exhibition:

The End of the 20th Century. The Best Is Yet to Come. A Dialogue with the Marx Collection (part of the museum’s permanent collection from Erich Marx)

Warhol of Joseph Beuys with diamond dust

Landscape of Beuys’s basalt sculptures

a giant Mao painting against Mao wallpaper in a room of violent images – Elvis with guns, electric chairs, knives, a car accident death, pointy-toed spiked-heeled pumps

Warhols Mao

 A film room 1920 William Kentridge from South Africa “Journey to the Moon” brought back to mind the films that inspired me to begin film making in the early 90’s. Special effects in the pre-digital era required a great deal of experimentation and imagination. Almost a century later, they are still effective as poetic storytelling devices. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPf63b6Glz8

A variety of Rauschenberg’s works such as Pink Door, Mule Deer, and collage prints described by John Cage as looking at several TV screens, on different channels, simultaneously

A Cy Twombly room featured several works including “The School of Fontainebleau” and “I am Thyrsis of Etna”, but my favorite of his works being shown was, “Empire of Flora” with its exciting treatment and colors of flowers. It has the sense of playing in a garden, getting ones hands dirty, pulling weeds, bumblebees, blooms and water streaming from a hose.

Full Empire Cy floral Cy signature Empire of Flora

This wing ended in an Anselm Kiefer gallery where the astounding “Lilith amroten Meer” commanded serious attention but only after visiting his less weighty work “Ways of Worldly Wisdom: Armenius’s Battle” on the side wall.

Lilith am roten Meertiny dressLilith textLilith backing detail Lilith cement detail

Ways of Worldly Wisdom

 

Rachel Whitereed – Untitled with Thomas Struth – San Zaccharia time lapse photograph

Whiteread and Struth

ceiling detail neon

The last exhibition we visited was the reason we came to the museum that day. Our film teacher, Anna Faroqhi, had to bow out of instructing our film workshop because her father, the film essayist, Harun Farocki, had died during the residency just a couple of days before the class was scheduled. We wanted to honor his memory by going to see his exhibition. The Hamburger Banhof was showing several of his works at the time, so instead of class we went to see some of his projects. On either side of the viewing room entrance two small monitors, and a viewing bench with headphones, invited visitors to relax and take in the show. However, the first essay was “Inextinguishable Fire”, a disquieting reenactment of the development of napalm at the Dow Chemical Plant and the atrocities committed by its use. **WATCH AT YOUR OWN RISK. It gets a gory: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JBbgWSBTdA

That foyer lead to a large room with four screens staggered throughout and showing the shorts from his, “Serious Games” series. These films explore different phases of soldier training from video game simulation, a live action simulation which took place in a small fabricated village with actors pretending to be the inhabitants, the creation of the video games, and post traumatic distress therapy. I found the post traumatic distress therapy to be useful in developing a conversation to have with my teenage brother should he still be considering joining the military.

Upon exiting, a compilation segments of at least three of films could be filmed on the other monitor. of his 1995 film “Interface”  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsA5E5qIgm4 , which gives a first hand look at how the artist worked in his editing room while comparing and contrasting film and video; “Workers Leaving the Factory in Eleven Decades” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPGSmvtmaWY, which touches on the historical uses of the factory as a control mechanism for the population; and “zwischen zwei Kriegen” (between two wars), which can be ordered along with his other works at the online video data bank http://www.vdb.org/artists/harun-farocki. I urge you to take some time to familiarize yourself with the catalogue of this prolific artist and eloquent, insightful writer.

SomoS Gallery Berlin – Transart Institute MFA Students – Open Frame Popup Show

All images copyright © 2014 by Stephanie Reid.

SomoS is on the 1st floor of corner building in the Kreuzberg neighborhood of Berlin. It is a large space flooded with soft natural light and a relaxing gathering room with bar in the back. The show on August 2, 2014 featured artists from 1st, 2nd, and graduating MFA classes, as well as, work from artists represented by tète gallery in the Prenzlauer Berg neighborhood. Putting work in the show was optional for students and were were asked to bring simple, fun works. First year students were told about the show shortly before it happened, so our work was either  made in Berlin or was work that had already been brought for presentations at school. Considering how impromptu it was, I think it turned rather well! Sadly, I did not get images of all the work in the show, but this is a sample.

SomoS bldg

SoMos corner

1st floor

SoMoS entry

SomoS buzzer

Here is the description of my piece (first of images below) which I created while I was in Berlin:

This drawing is from a series of scribble circle drawings, which began from an exhibit poster I created for my friends and I in The Yeah! Club Collectiph. The theme was to submit works made within 16 Seconds. The exhibit space was called Big Red Sun. To mirror the theme of the show, I scribbled a warm colored vortex symbolic of an experience I had while staring into the sun and it transformed into a portal. During the show, I created two other scribble circle drawings by only using each color for 16 seconds or less. To see those pieces, click below:

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Print-Graphics/G00007.A1XiQpiVg/I0000X6maOvNIox8/C0000wALAFGzPypk

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/ILLUSTRATION-MIXED-MEDIA/G0000l2uM6IqJSgc/I0000afXvtIIaZIQ

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/ILLUSTRATION-MIXED-MEDIA/G0000l2uM6IqJSgc/I0000HciXbIomPR4

 This piece called “The Earth and A Pine Tree” is the third in a group of covers created for compilation CDs, which I carefully selected songs for. This 2D series converges with 3D when one imagines the overlaid origami patterns folded to change the paper from the flat to the multi-dimensional. The other pieces are called “The Sun and A Lion” (for a Leo)  and “The Moon and a Lantern”. To see those pieces, click below:

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/ILLUSTRATION-MIXED-MEDIA/G0000l2uM6IqJSgc/I0000v75gIs.daRA

http://haikuflash.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/ILLUSTRATION-MIXED-MEDIA/G0000l2uM6IqJSgc/I0000qtO9L770Cqw

 

The Earth and a Pine Tree, CD compilation and foldable cover art by Stephanie Reid

Layered and cutout paper illustration of Earth with pine tree origami folding lines

Track list

The Earth and a Pine Tree, song selection and folded cover art

 

Lindy's painting

painting by Lindey Anderson

Lizs prints

prints by Liz Carré

Beauty Baco

positive film by Beau(ty) Baco

Ani

photo montage by Analia Sirabonian

translation = bad dog. This installation shows all the products the artist used to try to get the smell off of her dog after it had bothered a skunk.

translation = bad dog. This installation shows all the products the artist, Deborah Dudley, used to try to get the smell off of her dog after it had bothered a skunk.

marriage

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

back of dress

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

brides face

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

groom profile

marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

unraveling the marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

unraveling the marriage cocoon performance by Mariana Rocha and José Drummond

brushwork

I have forgotten whose this is at the moment :( but I really like it. I will post the artist’s name as soon as it is revealed to me.

Marions rocks

gold painted lava rocks by Marion Wasserman

skeletal watercolors

watercolors by ? with ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Clare as Ivy

ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Creeping

ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Jayes drawings

mixed media by Jaye Moscariello with ivy dance performance by Claire Elizabeth Barratt

Kelly

embroidery and oil on paper by Kelly Reyna Mackh

KJs sign responses

markings by KJ Schumacher

remote crucifix

remote crucifix by ?

Nicolas Cage talk

Andrea Spaziani and Allen Ferguson talk Nicolas Cage

Ethiopian funerary robe

Ethiopian funerary robe installation by Konjit Seyoum

Asher and Konjit

Asher Mains and Konjit Seyoum share experiences relating to her installation

Asher and Konjit connect

Asher Mains and Konjit Seyoum share experiences relating to her installation

mixed media by Robyn Thomas

mixed media by Robyn Thomas

Gabriel's landscape

landscape print by Gabriel Deerman

Joses film still

film still by José Drummond

intentional water

Intentional Water by Honi Ryan

Honi and Abdullah

Honi Ryan and Abdullah Khan review their notes after playing a relational game together

Honi and Abdul

Honi Ryan and Abdullah Khan review their notes after playing a relational game together

bar

SomoS bar

VW fun

colorful VW car outside the gallery

 https://vimeo.com/106879231willows

willows on the Spree

 Video footage of performances by Andrea Spaziani and Lynn Book can be seen at the links below. *Please excuse the flicker, I have never experienced that issue before. I either need to adjust the firmware on my camera or adjust the frame rate during filming in Europe next time!

Andrea sent postcards to participants who had previously expressed interest in her community dance project. Each card had a one sentence description of a type of dance that could be performed. During the course of the opening at SomoS gallery in Berlin this summer, she performed her own versions of each instruction. Here is a short clip illustrating one example. https://vimeo.com/106878394

Attendees were treated to a live performance by Transart advisor, Lynn Book, of the Dada vocal sound piece Ursonate (primeval sonata) written and developed by Kurt Schwitter between 1922 and 1932. The poem was a favorite of Transart Institute co-founder, Klaus Knoll, who suddenly fell ill earlier this year and passed away just before the summer residency began. Book honored his memory by flawlessly guiding us through sublime and comical terrains. I was captivated throughout the journey. To see an excerpt, visit: https://vimeo.com/106879231

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